Soaring in Ohio

The Great Western Trip

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Phase 1 – Mark Miller

In mid June Dan Reagan, Rolf Hegele and Mark Miller drove 1780 miles towing their gliders to Parowan, UT, where they flew 20 times and covered 8,541 kms of southern Utah.

Dan did about as many kms as Rolf and Mark together, but we won’t hold that against him.

July 10, 2018

There were about 30 motor gliders and 10 regular gliders at the camp. Every day we were launching about 30+ gliders with tows going off between every 2-4 motor launches. This fiberglass and carbon fiber flock would climb out over the foothills behind us and then head over the first range of mountains to get a second climb on higher ground before proceeding east or north along several mountain ridges. Here is a view of the ramp and the flock:

The views and the terrain were spectacular.

Here is a picture of the line of gliders waiting for the one tow plane while the motor gliders are taxing to the runway.

Every night one of the local restaurants would set up a buffet dinner in one of the hangars. You needed to land by 1900 if you wanted dinner and to swap lies. Soft drinks and wine were provided followed each evening by a talk by one of the camp members on some aspect of flying. Some of the longest flights in the USA and the world were flown out of Parowan by these participants.

Meanwhile John Lubon towed out to Moriarty, NM and flew four times for 3,849 kms.

Phase 2 starts 1 July when Rolf, John and Mark join up at Bernie Fullenkamp’s place next to airport in Morgan, UT for some flying in the Uinta Mountains and Dan heads to Ely, NV for some flying in the Great Basin desert area.

[Mark submitted the above Phase 1 article for publication a week ago, but the holiday precluded a newsletter on July 3. Mark is still on the road returning from the Great Western Trip, so we will have to wait for the rest of the story. However, the Online Contest website gives a little glimpse. – Editor]

Crew Chief Manual

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Crew Chief Manual

Take to the flight line and use as a resource. return to the club house at the end of the day.

This manual will be updated periodically and is maintained by the director of operations.

EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN CHECKLIST 2012

IMMEDIATELY:

  1. Call 911 (if injuries are involved) – 5375 Elbon Rd., Warren County, Waynesville, OH, 513-932-7627. Advise type of occurrence, location, directions, and number of victims.
  2. Render First-Aid.
  3. Position two members at the entrance to provide directions and restrict access

(including the media).

  1. Shut down operations. Notify those flying if possible.

NEXT

  1. Assign one member to be the Spokesperson and emergency services contact.
  2. Assign two members to be CCSC contacts with the family at the scene, hospital, or home. Coordinate actions with law enforcement or medical personnel.
  3. Assign one person to document accident information (times, facts, witnesses, photos, current conditions, etc.
  4. Secure the wreckage. Allow no one inside a perimeter area other than those necessary for occupant removal, fire-fighting, or rescue. Items removed for purposes of rescue of occupants must be retained locally for examination of Federal Air Safety investigators.

THEN

  1. Notify the following Club personnel:

President – Dan Reagan 513-476-4696

Safety Officer – Steve Statkus, 513-720-8955

Glider Maintenance (if appropriate) – John Dudley, 513-314-4823

Tow Plane Maintenance (if appropriate)- Paul Mcclaskey, 614-329-4945

  1. Notify the FAA Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) (if required by NTSB Part 830), 513-979-6400, 847-294-7401 (weekends).

FINALLY

  1. If the aircraft is released by the FAA-NTSB and State Police, and it can be moved, move it to a hanger or onto a trailer.
  2. If the aircraft cannot be moved, cover with tarps and secure the scene.
  3. Club President to contact the remaining Board members.
  4. As appropriate, contact the insurance company (VP responsibility).

EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN CEASAR CREEK SOARING CLUB 2012

This Emergency Response Plan sets forth some considerations for allocating resources while dealing with an emergency situation.

  1. The Crew Chief will be responsible for implementing the Emergency Response Plan and will remain in charge until the responsibility is turned over to another member.
  2. In the event of an accident or serious incident, operations will be shut down for the day.
  3. CCSC members shall at all times be fully cooperative with all emergency services personnel and the FAA-NTSB. Response to any inquiries shall be made by a single individual selected by the Crew Chief to be the spokesperson. (Investigating officials will ask questions: only the questions asked should be answered based upon your first-hand knowledge. Do not respond with opinions, speculations, suppositions or conclusions.)
  4. NTSB part 830 controls the reporting of accidents or incidents. (Note: Aircraft damage and personal injury does not necessarily mean an “accident” or “incident” as defined by the NTCCSC may not have a requirement to report, although the Club has a professional responsibility to assist in any way possible.)
  5. When notifying the FAA (which is acceptable in lieu of notifying the NTSB), specific information will be expected. Be prepared to relate the aircraft make, midel, N number, name of PIC, name of owner/ operator, date and time of accident, points of departure and intended landing, location of accident, number aboard and nature of injuries, nature of the accident, extent of damage, and weather conditions (record weather data immediately).
  6. Dealing with the news media will only be through the spokesperson as appointed by the Crew Chief. (The spokesperson will not release the names of anyone involved unless they are certain that family members have been advised of the situation. Only state what is currently being done, do not assign cause or speculate on any phase of the accident. The news media can be prevented from coming on the field: it is private property).

CREW CHIEF’S MANUAL – INDEX – 2012

  1. Crew Chief’s job description
  2. Open (for future use), Instructions on using
  3. Reporting requirements
  4. Currency, non-currency lists
  5. Pilot information cards
  6. Crew schedule
  7. Key locations and lock combinations
  8. Gridding recommendations
  9. Retrieval procedures
  10. Cone of safety
  11. Red tag procedure & communication requirements
  12. Aircraft and vehicle maintenance responsibilities
  13. Crew members manual
  14. Student pilot’s yellow training book and student training handbook
  15. ID tags
  16. Operations during non scheduled flying days
  17. Off site operations

Remote

Local

  1. Uniform Operating Procedures
  2. By-laws
  3. List of fees and dues

Guest ride fees and forms

Limited membership form for guest rides

Aero recovery fees for land outs

  1. New member packets
  2. Emergency procedures
  3. Stroke/heart attack symptoms
  4. Members and contact information

Tow pilot contact information

Flight instructor contact information

Crew chief contact information

CCSC member contact information

CREW CHIEF’S Manual Index – 2014

  1. Crew Chiefs Job Description
  2. Instructions on How To Use PayPal Billing
  3. Daily Report Requirements
  4. Open
  5. Pilot Card Information
  6. Crew Schedule
  7. Key Locations and Lock Combinations
  8. Gridding Recommendations
  9. Glider Retrieval Procedures
  10. Cone of Safety and Set-up
  11. Red Tag Procedures and Communication Requirements
  12. End of Day Procedures
  13. Crew Member Manual
  14. Student Pilot’s Training Book & Handbook
  15. ID Tag Colors
  16. Operations During Non-Scheduled Flying Days
  17. Remote Off-site Operations
  18. Uniform Operating Procedures (UOP’s) (4/2014)
  19. Current By-Laws (4/2014)
  20. List of Fees and Dues
  21. Guest Flight Fees
  22. Limited Member Form
  23. Aero Retrieve Fees for Land-outs
  24. New Member Packets
  25. Accident and Emergency Procedures
  26. Motorola T5720 – Walkie-Talkie Manual
  27. Heat Stroke and Heart Attack Symptoms and Procedures
  28. Important Contact Information
  29. Crew Chief Contact List ( 4 / 2014)
  30. Club Officers List (4/2014)
  31. Tow pilot and Instructors Contact List (4/2014)
  32. Current Membership Listing (4/11/2014)

Vertex Handheld Radio — Essential Need-to-Knows

10/27/16

The handheld radios can play a very important role in safe club operations. Ground crews should have them readily available and know how to use them. Those flying 233’s should take them along.

The radio is a complicated … this guide is intended to convey the essentials.

The complete manual is in the Crew Chief’s notebook

  • If the radio won’t turn on, remove the battery and reinstall
  • CCSC Traffic Frequency is 123.300
  • If stuck on EMER, WX freq or some other page, unlock the keypad (if necessary), press “ENT” key until “VFO” is displayed and times out, and then depress the transit buttom
  • If you hear continuous static, first try momentarily pressing the black circular Monitor button on the left side of the radio. If the static does not go away, adjust the squelch per below

KEYPAD LOCK: Keep the keypad locked unless making changes to frequencies or modes. To lock/unlock the keypad, press “F” and then “ENT.” A lock symbol will appear on the screen when locked.

VOLUME AND FREQUENCY CONTROL: The DIAL knob on top OR the keypad UP/DN arrows can control the volume and frequency settings. Which does what depends on setup; DIAL is the default for volume control and the UP/DN arrows are the default for frequency control. With the KEYPAD LOCK active, you cannot use the UP/ON arrows. Therefore, it is best for the DIAL knob to be set for volume control {since that is used more often) and the UP/DN arrows set for frequency control.

ENTERING A FREQUENCY (SHOULD BE SET TO 123.300 AT CCSC):

  1. Unlock the keypad if locked (press “F” and “ENT”)

If the LCD screen does not show a frequency:

  1. Press “ENT” until “VFO” is displayed; wait “‘ 3 seconds for time out & continue with step 3 below If the LCD screen shows a frequency:
  2. Manually type in the frequency; alternatively use the DIAL or UP/DN arrows (setup dependent)
  3. Lock the keypad (press “F” and “ENT”)

Vertex Handheld Radio — Essential Need-to-Knows

10/27/16

SQUELCH: The squelch should be set as low as possible to ensure reception of transmissions from airborne aircraft. Set it to 1 if possible; if static is present, set it to next highest value where continuous static is not heard. Set the squelch as follows (steps below do no correlate with numbers in the figure):

  1. Press the “F” key and then the “ENT” key to unlock the keypad
  2. Press the “F” key and then the􀀐 SET key
  3. Wait~ 3 secs for the “SET MD” display to time out
  4. Rotate the DIAL until “SQL” appears (if not already displayed)
  5. Press the “ENT” key; “SQL” value begins to flash
  6. Rotate the DIAL knob to select setting (set to 1 unless receiving static)
  7. Press the “ENT” key to save setting
  8. Press the transmit button to exit
  9. Press the “F” key and then the “ENT” key to lock the controls

NOTE: You can override/disable the squelch by depressing the Monitor button on the left side of the radio for 2 seconds. Squelch is re-enabled by momentarily pressing the Monitor button.

1.0 CREW CHIEF’S DUTIES:

The crew chief is responsible for all aspects of flight operations at CCSC for the assigned crew day.

  • The primary goal is to conduct flight operations safely and efficiently so that at the end of the day the gliders and support vehicles are put away in serviceable condition so that the following crew can pull them out, pre-flight and began flight operations without undue delay.
  • The crew chief should be thoroughly cognizant with his duties as defined in the UOP’s sections 2.1 and 2.2. These duties are found in the UOP section of this manual.
  • The crew chief should be aware that guests on the field are his responsibility also. He is the spokesman for the club and should be aware that guests are potential new members and should be treated as such.
  • The Gl03 & K21 have as a result of their design a possibility of damage if an inappropriate landing results in repeated nose wheel/tail wheel strikes

(sometimes identified as a PIO.) If such a landing occurs, the glider must be removed from service, red tagged and inspected before return to flight. The crew chief needs to hang a red tag and report that the glider is out of service on his daily report.

Instructions on How to bill a flight to CCSC PayPal account:

  1. Scan the QR code with a smartphone scanner.
  2. Select Flight option and amount.
  3. Select “Buy Now” Button
  4. Select Paypal
  5. With Credit Card
  6. Bill Me Later, is NOT an acceptable option.
  7. Fill out Credit Card information
  8. Hit Continue …
  9. Hit Pay Now.
  10. Guest should receive a confirmation number in an email. They will need to get into email and show confirmation to Crew Chief before flight is given. This does need to be done for each guest flight.

Alternative, use card reader

  • Install “PayPal Here” app
  • Casrd reader is in “PayPal Here” box in the top drawer of the cabinet in trailer
  • Login ID and password are written inside the box with card reader

2.0 CREW CHIEF DAILY CHECKLIST:

3.0 DAILY REPORTING REQUIREMENTS:

Each crew is required to provide a daily summary at the end of the day that includes:

  • Number of flights,
  • Number of guest rides and revenue received,
  • Tow plane tack time at end of the day,
  • Any squawks on aircraft or ground support equipment, red tags hung, or any other unusual events,
  • Condition of the flying field, weather issues, etc.

This daily summary should be submitted to all crew chiefs, assistant crew chiefs, all members of the CCSC and SSD Boards as well as the Directors of Maintenance, Operations, Grounds, Tow Planes and Glider Maintenance, the people responsible for resolving issues will be aware of the issue the day it occurs so corrective action can begin immediately. A current list of contacts follows.

As of Nov. 2011 this distribution is being made via email which causes some problems due to revolving members and changing email addresses. It is anticipated that the process will be tied to the web site and the distribution list will be constant and updated as members change.

4.0 NON-CURRENT MEMBER LIST:

This list is updated by the business manager and will be given to the crew chief at the beginning of the crew day along with the crew member list. Any club member on this list must take a check ride before solo flight in club aircraft is authorized.

5.0 PILOT INFORMATION CARDS:

The pilot information cards are kept in the crew trailer. They contain: bi-annual data, next of kin information, pilot license information and aircraft the pilot is authorized to fly. It is the responsibility of the pilot to keep these cards current.

6.0 CREW SCHEDULE:

The crew schedule is distributed with the November newsletter. A copy follows.

7.0 KEY LOCATIONS AND COMBINATIONS:

Due to our resident personnel changes, the club has taken some steps to secure the facilities. This will change once new tenets are found and on the property. Until then the following applies:

  • Clubhouse door: Secured with a lock box combo: 2-2-7-2. Within the lock box is a key to the clubhouse and the crew chiefs locker.
  • Gas Pumps: The electrical service for the gas pumps is locked with a key. A copy of the key is on each tow plane key ring and also in the crew chiefs locker.
  • Crew Chiefs Locker: Each crew chief ought to have a copy of the key to the locker. Inside are copies of all keys to the gas pumps, Kobota, gas cart, and tow plane hanger.
  • Tow Plane Hanger: The entry door key is found in the crew chiefs locker.
  • Office: The office has limited access to specific board members. It is secured by lock box. Contact the CCSC Secretary for access.

8.0 FLIGHT LINE GLIDER GRID RECOMMENDATIONS:

Copies of the grid recommendations for operating at either end of the field follows. These recommendations have been vetted by several crews and found to be satisfactory however it is up to the crew chief to adjust the recommendations as conditions warrant. By way of example:

  • For high density altitude days every effort should be made to extend the takeoff runway length for the glass gliders. This can be accomplished by moving back towards the end of the field the takeoff point for the glass gliders. Care should be exercised to not violate the 45 degree cone of safety. Repositioning the glass glider take off point rearward may require repositioning the parking of the Schweizers and tow planes.
  • The same applies to soft field conditions or for those times when the grass needs to be mowed.
  • For landing at either end of the field, we observe a displaced threshold of about 400 feet. The displaced threshold is identified by a large yellow or orange cone. To further identify the displaced threshold, the grass before the threshold is being allowed to grow higher than the mowed landing surface.

9.0 RETRIEVAL PROCEDURES:

Retrieval of gliders should be done on the South edge of the field regardless of the operating end.

  • Keeping the glider as close as possible to the edge of the field will allow maximum landing options should multiple gliders approach the field at the same time.
  • The wing walker should be on the landing field side of the glider facing landing traffic. If a glider is on final the wing walker should signal the driver to stop and set the wing on the ground signaling the landing glider he is in sight and should proceed with the landing.
  • Continue the retrieve down the South edge of the field until well past the displaced threshold. Visually check the downwind patten, and the base leg both left and right before crossing the threshold. Do so perpendicular to the runway and as quickly as possible.
  • If retrieving a Schweizer 2-33, use the field dollies to prevent damage to the non steerable tail wheel.
  • At the end of the day gliders being returned to the hanger should be removed from the flying field as quickly as practical. Care should be taken due to landing traffic of private gliders.

10. CONE OF SAFETY:

The cone of safety describes an area in front of the glider when it is on tow. It describes an area that encompasses approximately 90 degrees, 45 degrees on each side of a centerline passing through the centerline of the glider fuselage. Any object in this area is a hazard during tow and every effort should be made to keep this area free of objects, other gliders landing, golf carts, gliders being retrieved, cars, people etc.

11. RED TAGS:

Red tags are used to alert operators the equipment is unserviceable or it’s operation is questionable. They can appear on gliders, tow planes, golf cartsi and tractors. Any crewmember authorized to operate the equipment may hang a red tag if they question the operation or determine the equipment is inoperable.

When a red tag is hung on the equipment it should include the name of the person who has determined the equipment is non serviceable, the date and a brief statement of the fault or suspected fault. The crew chief should be notified of the red tag and reason for it. He will include the details in his crew chief report at the end of the day.

No equipment should be operated with a red tag affixed.

Red tags can will be removed from gliders or tow planes only by the Director of Maintenance for gliders or tow planes or his designated representative. The Director of Operations or his designated representative has the authority to remove red tags from golf carts. The Director of Facilities or his designated representative has the authority to remove red tags from mowing equipment.

Additional red tags are located in the office and also in the glider hanger on the work bench near the crew chiefs locker.

12. AIRCRAFT AND VEHICLE MAINTENANCE:

It is the responsibility of the crew chief to ensure all equipment is serviceable before it is used and at the end of the day is returned cleaned serviceable for the next crew day, or if unserviceable a red tag is affixed and the cause for the red tag is communicated.

At the end of the crew day, gliders, tow planes and golf carts should be washed down (if muddy) and free of trash. Seat cushions should be returned to the trailer and the trash cans emptied.

All gliders with batteries should be hooked up to the chargers and the glass gliders properly covered when in the hanger.

15. NAME (ID) TAGS:

In order to make identification easier, the following name tag colors will be utilized:

ORANGE Pre-solo and initial solo students

YELLOW Advanced solo students (more than 10 solo flights)

BLUE Private Pilot

GOLD Commercial Pilot

GRAY Certified Flight Instructor

16. OPERATIONS DURING NON-SCHEDULED FLYING DAYS:

All guidelines for safe operations on normal scheduled flying days apply to non­scheduled flying days; a qualified person should be identified as crew chief. This person assumes the all duties and responsibilities of a crew chief. It is imperative that any person who assumes this position be familiar with the duties of the crew chief position.

The normal reporting requirements apply.

17. OFF-SITE OPERATIONS:

From time to time, CCSC club members may transport CCSC aircraft to another location to set up temporary flight operations away from the home gliderport. This is done to provide CCSC members the opportunity to experience soaring conditions, such as ridge or wave, which are not available at the home gliderport.

Off-site operations may also be used to promote soaring in general and solicit new members. In general, such trips are encouraged by the club, provided they are conducted in a safe and organized manner.

Prior to transporting any CCSC aircraft, or other equipment, from the gliderport permission must be obtained from either the CCSC Board of Trustees, or from the day’s acting Crew Chief. For each off-site operation, a CCSC club member must be designated to serve as “Director of Off-Site Operations”. This individual shall direct the off-site operation and shall have the same authority as a regular Crew Chief.

The “Director of Off-Site Operations” shall maintain a record of expenses incurred and shall see that each flight is recorded on a CCSC Flight Record Card. These records shall be given to the CCSC Business Manager to be used in calculating flight charges.

Flight charges for off-site operations shall be calculated by totaling all expenses incurred during the off-site operation and dividing by the total number of glider flights recorded.

REMOTE OPERATIONS:

STEWART’S AIRPORT: Operations at Stewart’s either daily training or winch towing are not considered “remote” and additional fees do not apply.

THE RIDGE: The ridge is considered remote and additional fees may apply. Mileage to and from the ridge should be shared by the members using the glider.

CLINTON COUNTY: Operations at Clinton County Airport in the spring time will require an adjustment to the fees due to the additional cost of hangaring the gliders.

Caesar Creek Soaring Club

Guest ride fee schedule

3000 ft tow $100

Mile high tow {5280 feet} $150

EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN CHECKLIST

IMMEDIATELY:

  1. Call 911 (if there are injuries): 5385 Elbon Rd. Waynesville in Warren County. Give your contact number or have someone man the main number (513) 932-7627.
  2. Administer First-Aid to injured, and keep them calm.
  3. Have someone man the front gate to direct emergency personnel and restrict media access.
  4. Operations will be ceased, and announcement should be made on the radio of situation at gliderport.

NEXT:

  1. Assign a member to be a spokesperson and emergency service contact. (Crew Chief)
  2. Assign 2 members to be CCSC contact for the family at the scene, hospital or home. Coordinate actions with law enforcement or medical personnel.
  3. Assign a member to document accident information (time, facts, witnesses, photos, weather conditions, etc.)
  4. Secure the wreckage. Allow no one onto gliderport perimeter, other than emergency, law enforcement personnel, FAA or NTSB.

THEN:

  1. Notify important Club personnel:
  2. Club Presidents (CCSC/SSD)
  3. Safety Officer/Flight Ops Dir. – See current contact list for numbers. Notify the FAA Flight Standards office in Cincinnati, (513) 842-9600, 4358 Ferguson Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45245.

FINALLY:

  1. Once aircraft is released to F AA/NTSB or State Police, it can be moved to a secure location, such as a hangar, or trailer.
  2. If aircraft cannot be moved, cover with tarps and secure accident scene.
  3. Advise Board member via email (ccsc-board@nullsoar-ccsc.com)
  4. CCSC V.P. should contact insurance company on next business day.

STROKE/HEART ATTACK SYMPTOMS

STROKE

Always remember to call 911

Stroke is a common and often misunderstood condition and its early symptoms are often ignored. Some brain cells deprived of oxygen die within minutes. Others may take a few hours to die depending on the nature of the blockage or hemorrhage. The loss of physical and mental functions is often permanent and can include motor-function disability. The most effective treatment for stroke can be administered if it is within three hours of the onset of stroke.

Although strokes can occur at any age, most stroke patients (two-thirds) are over the age of 65.

A stroke happens when a part of the brain is impaired from lack of blood, usually because one of the arteries that supply oxygen-carrying blood to the brain has been damaged. There are two ways this can happen:

  1. Clogged vessel or is chemic stroke: Caused by blockage of a blood vessel in the brain, usually by a blood clot or by fatty deposits on the vessel wall. 85% of strokes are ischemic.
  2. Burst vessel or hemorrhagic stroke: Caused by a ruptured blood vessel, preventing normal flow and allowing blood to leak into brain tissue, destroying it.

This occurs in 15% of strokes.

STROKE HAPPENS.

Know the signs and symptoms. Act F.A.S.T!

FAST stands for face, arms, speech and time, and is being used as part of a campaign by the Stroke Awareness Foundation to educate the public about warning signs of stroke and seek proper medical services immediately. If you think a person is having a stroke, call 9-1-1, especially if the person has trouble with these basic commands.

Face – Does one side of the face droop?

Ask the person to smile.

Arms – Is one arm weak or numb?
Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

Speech – Is speech slurred?

Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence. Is the sentence repeated correctly?

Time – If the person shows any of these symptom

CALL 9-1-1 immediately!

  • Do not drive the patient to the hospital yourself.
  • EMS caries drugs and equipment that can help improve the patient’s condition. They know the quickest route to a hospital with a stroke center! (They can save your life)

Heart Attack

Always remember to call 911

The warning signs and symptoms of a heart attack aren’t the same for everyone. Many heart attacks start slowly as mild pain or discomfort. Some people don’t have symptoms at all. Heart attacks that occur without any symptoms or very mild symptoms are called silent heart attacks.

Chest Pain or Discomfort

The most common heart attack symptom is chest pain or discomfort. This includes new chest pain or discomfort or a change in the pattern of existing chest pain or discomfort.

Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center or left side of the chest that often lasts for more than a few minutes or goes away and comes hack.

The discomfort can feel like:

  • Uncomfortable pressure
  • Squeezing, fullness
  • Pain – The feeling can be mild or severe.
  • Upper body discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw, or upper part of the stomach
  • Shortness of breath – may occur with or before chest discomfort
  • Nausea – (feeling sick to your stomach), vomiting, light-headedness or sudden dizziness, or breaking out in a cold sweat
  • Sleep problems, fatigue (tiredness), or lack of energy

The more signs and symptoms you have, the more likely it is that you’re having a heart attack. Not everyone having a heart attack has typical symptoms. If you’ve already had a heart attack, your symptoms may not be the same for another one. However, some people may have a pattern of symptoms that recur.

CALL 9-1-1 immediately!

  • Do not drive the patient to the hospital yourself.
  • EMS caries drugs and equipment that can help improve the patient’s condition. They know the quickest route to a hospital with a chest pain center! (They can save your life)

AEDs

Patients with signs and symptoms of heart attach should be connected to this device as a safety precaution

Always remember to call 911

An automated external defibrillator or AED is a portable electronic device that automatically diagnoses the potentially life threatening cardiac arrhythmias of ventricular fibrillation and ventricular tachycardia in a patient, and is able to treat them through defibrillation, the application of electrical shock which stops the arrhythmia, allowing the heart to reestablish an effective rhythm. With simple audio and visual commands, AEDs are designed to be simple to use.

Crew chiefs and crew:

Take the time to locate and familiarize yourself with these devices

Locations:

  1. In the club house in a Black Bag hanging on the wall next to the telephone
  2. In the crew trailer in a Black Bag hanging on the wall opposite the side door

Crew Chiefs manual

Directions for Oxygen use:

Equipment list

To deliver emergency oxygen, you need:

  1. Nasal cannula: Oxygen at 4lpm is recommended on patients suspected of having a Myocardial Infarction (Heart Attack) or stroke according to Adult Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) guidelines,
  2. An oxygen cylinder.
  3. A regulator with pressure gauge and flowmeter.
  4. A delivery device, such as a nasal cannula
  5. Place the oxygen cylinder between the patient’s legs to prevent the cylinder from rolling around.
  6. Connect the cannula to the Oxygen regulator
  7. Turn oxygen on at 4L/M
  8. Place the nasal cannula prongs in the patient’s nose
  9. Wrap the cannula tubing around the patient’s ears and secure the cannula by sliding the adjustment under the patient’s chin

Oxygen should be delivered with properly sized equipment for the respective victims and appropriate flow rates for the delivery device we will use a nasal cannula.

A nasal cannula is a plastic tube, held in place over the victim’s ears, with two small prongs that are inserted into the victim’s nose. This device is used to administer oxygen to a breathing victim with minor breathing problems.

In the United States, oxygen cylinders are labeled “U.S.P.” and marked with a yellow diamond that says “Oxygen.” U.S.P. stands for United States Pharmacopeia and indicates the oxygen is to be used for medical purposes. In the United States, oxygen cylinders typically have green markings.

You Tube film on nasal cannula application:

“Applying Nasal Cannula.YOB

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2KaP18PjUmU

 

 

 

 

YAW STRINGS –

10 inch strings with 1 knots on each end are for ASK21 and Grob canopies

12 inch strings with 1 knot on one end are for 2-33 pitot tubes …

Use¾ inch circles to mount strings on ASK21 and Grob canopies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do You Want To Fly Cross Country?

Posted Leave a commentPosted in featured

Have you been flying around the airport wishing to break the bonds and fly cross country? Are you considering buying a glider but just don’t know if cross country is for you? If you have a glider rating or are about to get one, here is an opportunity to be exposed to a low stress cross country experience. I am offering a back seat ride in a two place motorglider to those interested. I don’t know how many soarable days we will have for the next month but if you are interested, just contact me at dreagan<at>fuse.net and I will put you on the list. Let me know if you can fly on days other than Saturday and Sunday. We will discuss the decision making process during the whole flight so it should be quite informative. Remember that although we will be in a MOTOR glider, there is always a possibility of a landout. – Dan Reagan

From the May 8, 2018 Frequent Flyer.

What is the Greatest Gift?

Posted Leave a commentPosted in featured, Frequent Flyer

A new aircraft (Duhhh!)

OK, what time comes in as a close second?

Giving someone their life back! If you take the time to learn First Aid, CPR and how to use the club’s AED devices you will have the tools to possibly save someone’s life.

Statistics show that over 90% of cases where someone had to do CPR it is on a person that they know, a family member or friend.

We.will be conducting brief classes covering basic First Aid, CPR and AED use during the club clean up day. There is no cost and all.are welcome.

Remember, the life you save could be someone you love.- Dave Menchen


The April 3 issue of the ‘Frequent Flyer” newsletter of Caesar Creek Soaring Club is
available on the club website at this link.

Jim Dudley

Ladies and gents, I’m entering my 1-26 in the 2018 1-26 championship…

Posted Leave a commentPosted in featured, Frequent Flyer

3-20-18 FREQUENT FLYER


UPCOMING EVENTS

  • Mar 24 Crew Chiefs meeting – 9:30 AM – Mark Miller
  • Apr 7 Board of Directors meeting- 9:30 AM – John Lubon
  • Apr 11 Annual Meeting of SSD dba CCSC & Election – John Lubon
  • Apr 14 Spring Cleanup at CCSC – Keith Kilpatrick
  • Apr 15 Spring Cleanup at CCSC – Keith Kilpatrick
  • Apr 21 Cincinnati Chapter of Ferrari Club of America Event – Maury Drummey
  • Apr 21 Pot Luck Dinner Apr 21 Pot Luck Dinner
  • May 19 WPAFB Airmen Recreation Program event at CCSC – Kevin Price
  • May 20-31 1-26 Championship Contest – Steve Statkus
  • Jun 9 WPAFB Airmen Recreation Program event at CCSC – Kevin Price
  • Jun 16 Cincinnati Chapter of Ferrari Club of America Event – Maury Drummey
  • Jun 16 Pot Luck Dinner Jun 16 Pot Luck Dinner
  • Jul 15-20 YEW 2018 – Steve McManus
  • Aug 3 WPAFB Airmen Recreation Program event at CCSC – Kevin Price
  • August Adult Camp
  • August Sailplane Weight & Balance Party – Chuck Lohre
  • Oct 21 WPAFB Airmen Recreation Program event at CCSC – Kevin Price

SPRING OFFICIALLY ARRIVED AT 12:15 PM ON TUESDAY, MARCH 20

Even at CCSC there appear to be signs of spring with the runway dry enough and the weather cooperating to permit flights both days this past weekend. Don’t delay, fly while the conditions permit.

THIRD SATURDAY CREW REPORT – MAURY DRUMMEY

An early start enabled us to get in two currency flights prior to the scheduled meeting of CCSC Instructors. Since everyone else needed an annual field check, operations halted until after the instructor’s meeting. Then we got in three more flights before the rain shut things down for the day.

THIRD SUNDAY CREW REPORT – MARK MILLER

The weather finally cooperated. We operated from the west end and had 26 flights plus one self launch. This included 2 guest rides. Most members needed annual field checks, but we had only one instructor or we would have had more flights. I noted 8 kts in a thermal by the spillway, so a few people went XC. – Mark Miller, Acting Crew Chief

WHICH BADGE DO YOU PLAN TO EARN IN 2018?

Last week the FAI Gold Badge distance requirement of a 300-km (186.4 mile) flight was shown to be routinely accomplished by CCSC members flying from our home gliderport. The other requirement for the Gold Badge is an altitude gain of 3,000 meters (9,843-feet). Is that even possible in Ohio? Well, yes, it has been done. The table lists the altitude records for Ohio recognized by SSA. So, talk with John Lubon or Jim Price about how they would achieve nearly 3 times as much altitude gain as the records they currently hold for motorgliders. Rumor has it that some have equipped their gliders with full IFR instrumentation and attempted to ride a towering cumulus all the way to the top. A better approach might be to plan a trip to other locations in the US where wave flights are possible. To earn the Gold Badge you will probably choose to fulfil the altitude gain requirement outside Ohio.

22 YEARS AGO AT CCSC

The newsletter reported the statistics for 1995. The club made 3547 flights. We did a lot more training in those days. The 2-33’s, 15H and 135 made 1191 flights. The private ships made 999 flights. The leading instructors were: Otto Maurer – 153, Jim O’Quinn – 145, Sidney Decker – 132 and JimHurst – 121. Leading tow pilots were: George Stillwagon – 397, John Antrim – 355, Dana Colvin – 299, Rich Carraway – 214 and Deiter Schmidt – 199.

BRONZE BADGE QUESTION OF THE WEEK

What minimum radio equipment is required for operation within Class C airspace?

a) Two-way radio communications equipment and a 4096-code transponder.
b) Two-way radio communications equipment, a 4096-code transponder, and DME.
c) Two-way radio communications equipment, a 4096-code transponder, and an encoding
See the SSF Study Guide for a practice test with all the questions.

SPRING CLEAN UP SET FOR APRIL 14th & 15th – KEITH KILPATRICK

In order to keep our club looking pristine spring is a good time to rid our members of cabin fever by getting us outdoors to participate in the annual CCSC spring clean up. As a club member your participation in these biannual events is necessary therefore we will be having this years clean up and beautification over a weekend to accommodate working schedules. There is much needed support to accomplish these tasks so please come out for some fun in sun and maybe get your hands dirty. Lunch and entertainment will be provided. – Keith Kilpatrick

LEADERS NEEDED

The eleven directors of SSD dba CCSC are elected for three-year terms which are staggered so we need to elect three or four each year at the Annual Meeting on the second Wednesday of April (4/11/2018). This year the terms in office for John Lubon, Tim Christman and Brian Stoops expire, so we need to elect three directors for three-year terms to fill those posiitons. In addition, Steve Statkus has resigned from his position as director so we need to elect one director to finish out the two remaining years of Steve’s term. Brian Stoops has a new job which requires him to work weekends so Brian will not run for reelection as a director. John Lubon and Tim Christman have each agreed to serve an additional 3-year term if reelected, but that still leaves two positions which must be filled by other members. If you would consider contributing your leaership skills to serving the club in this way, please contact John Lubon or any other member of the board and John will add your name to the list of candidates.

There are additional appointed leadership positions which are currently vacant where your skills and interests may match the club needs. Speak with any of the current directors and indicate your willingness to serve.

SEEKING TEAM MEMBERS FOR 1-26 CONTEST – STEVE STATKUS

Ladies and gents, I’m entering my 1-26 in the 2018 1-26 championship, but as a team glider. Not a traditional 2 person team but as a multiple pilot team. I’m looking for a minimum of 5 pilots to join TEAM CCSC. We already have a Team Manager and Spiritual Guru; OutLand Bob Root has agreed to provide coaching, leadership, and spiritual guidance to the team. He’s also charged with keeping the beer cooler filled. I’ll cover the entry fee you’ll just pay tow fees to 2 K AGL at the normal club rate. We’ve planned for ten contest days and two practice days so I’d expect each pilot to be ready to fly for two days and retrieve crew for two days. Really we won’t fly 10 days due to weather and pilot fatigue but we’ll accommodate your schedule.

I’ll have my glider ready in March and I’d like each pilot to take a couple of flights to get familiar with the bird and the instrumentation. I’d like each pilot to demonstrate a short field landing also. You don’t have to have 1-26 time in your log book. This Team CCSC is about having FUN and if we come in last lets just get some distance points for bragging rights. ZERO PRESSURE, FUN METER PEGGED AT MAX. – Steve Statkus call sign Buckeye

ANNUAL FIELD FLIGHT REVIEW REQUIRED NOW

Remember that CCSC has a requirement that each member complete a CCSC Field Flight Review with a CCSC instructor and get the instructor’s endorsement in his/her logbook each calendar year prior to acting as PIC of any CCSC glider (UOP 4.2-Pilot Qualifications). Your first CCSC glider flight of the year must be with an instructor. Take advantage of the good spring days ahead to get the requirement completed well in advance of the great soaring that is sure to follow. You will want to spend your time soaring then, not waiting for your turn to do the Flight Review. Also, check your logbook. Do you need to complete the FAR 61.56 Flight Review this year? If so, why not combine the two flight reviews and get both completed when they will not interfere with the soaring you want to do during the great weather later this year.

HELP FINDING SOMEONE TO SWAP CREW DAY ASSIGNMENTS

A web-based process for facilitating swapping crew day assignments was announced in the 2/21/2017 Frequent Flyer along with instructions for using the system. This process is intended to help members find another member who will agree to swap crew duties for one specific set of dates. It is not for getting reassigned to a different crew for an indefinite period. Mark Miller is now the person who oversees crew assignments, so Mark is the one to whom you need to speak about a long term change.

Remember that UOP 2.2 CREW MEMBER DUTIES states: “All crew members are to report for duty at 9:30 AM and work until released by the Crew Chief. Each crew member is personally responsible for arranging for a qualified substitute in case of his or her absence. Scheduled crew members are expected to be present for each of their scheduled crew days regardless of flying conditions.” This new process does not relieve any crew member from the responsibility for arranging for a qualified substitute and informing the crew chief; rather it is intended to help accomplish that task.

As of 6:00 pm on 2/13/2018 there is one request for a member to swap or substitute a crew day.
Date: 1st Saturday in July 07-07-2018
Skills: Crew
Click Here: Sub/Swap

JONNY STEWART IS NOW SKYDIVE SPORTS!

He is providing a drop off service right here at CCSC. If you need your parachute repacked, just leave it in the CCSC office and fill out one of the service cards and attach it to your rig.
Contact Jonny
Phone: 937-267-1733
Email: skydivesports@nullgmail.com
https: //www.facebook.com/skydivesports/
https://www.instagram.com/skydivesports/

WANTED TO BUY

Open trailer Schweizer, Gehrlein or equivalent. Any condition. Contact: Guy Byars

FOR SALE

ASW 20L $29,000, (Factory L model sold with both 16.59 M wing extensions and M&H winglets) TT 1108 hrs. Komet trailer, Modified Cobra wing tip wheel, tow out bar. Excellent canopy, newer gas spring, older gelcoat. Cambridge L nav, Colibri flight recorder, Dittle ATR720B (old but works good) with new boom mic, Avier with LK-8000. Logs since new. Contact Tony Bonser tbonser@nullcinci.rr.com

Craftsman Snow Blower 22″, Self-propelled, 2-stage, Electric start. $195. Contact Tim Christman (937)475-1445
Schweizer SGS 1-23, S/N 14, MFG Date May1950, includes open trailer. Has won vintage sailplane awards. Contact Thomas G. Bonser.

CCSC MEDIA

Note: See Membership Roster on website for contact information for all members.
CCSC IS ON FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/CaesarCreekSoaringClub
CCSC WEBSITE www.soarccsc.com
MINUTES FROM BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETINGS http://www.soarccsc.com/resources/members/meetingminutes/ (The password is printed on your monthly statement.)

CCSC GROUND CREWS:

1ST SATURDAY
CC: Steve Fenstermaker (cell: 937-581-7713) Tow Pilots: John Armor, CR Gillespie. Instructors: Paul McClaskey, Tom McDonald. Crew: Gerry Daugherty, Mark Hanlon, Joe Jaap, Kevin Price, Dan Beans, Jul Alvarez, D. Mattmuller, B. Sanbongi, A. Quinn, Michael Zengel, Waseem Jamali.

1ST SUNDAY – Training Crew
CC: Mike Karraker (cell: 937-830-0627) ACC: Mark Miller. Tow Pilots: Manfred Maurer, Norb Maurer, Dieter Schmidt, Andy Swanson. Instructors: Bob Miller. Crew: Don Burns, Bill Clawson, Christian Maurer, Ethan Maxwell, Eran Moscona, Dave Rawson, Joe Zeis..

2ND SATURDAY
CC: Dick Holzwarth (cell: 937-542-9612) ACC: Jim Marks, Bob Root. Tow Pilots: Haskell Simpkins. Instructors: Bob Anderson, Bill Gabbard, Jim Price. Crew: Bill Hall, Ron Kellerman, Brian Mork, Chloe Williams, Michael Williams.

2ND SUNDAY
CC: Dave Menchen (cell: 513-313-2315) ACC: Lucy Anne McKosky. Tow Pilots: Lorrie Penner, Gordon Penner, Instructors: Jim Goebel, Tom McDonald, Tom Rudolf. Crew: Dave Conrad, Fred Hawk, Dan Katuzienski, Mike McKosky.

3RD SATURDAY
CC: Maury Drummey (cell: 513-871-1998) ACC: Rolf Hegele. Tow Pilots: Don Green, Steve McManus, Dick Scheper.

3RD SUNDAY
CC: Mark Miller (acting) (cell: 513-235-6128) ACC: TBD Tow Pilots: Tony Bonser, Tim Christman. Instructors: Dick Eckels, Crew: Darin Caviness, Otis Lewis, Dan Miner, Tony Rein, Zach Siefker, David Whapham,

4TH SATURDAY
CC: Chuck Lohre (cell: 513-260-9025) ACC: Ethan Saladin. Tow Pilots: Guy Byars, Larry Kirkbride. Instructors: John Atkins, Joe Jackson. Crew: Edgar Byars, Ross Bales, Andrew Dignan, Helen Lohre, Henry Meyerrose, John Murray.

4TH SUNDAY
CC: Steve Statkus (cell: 513-720-8955) ACC: TBD Tow Pilots: Ron Blume, Matt Davis, Tim Morris. Instructors: John Lubon, Kat McManus. Crew: Lynn Alexander, Bill Barone, Mauricio Berrizbeitia, Richard Cedar, Shelby Estell, Jeff Grawe, M. Hosta, Keith Kilpatrick, Dan Reagan, Pete Schradin, Stefano Sinigaglia, Laviniu Tirca John Williams. 2018

5th WEEKEND CREW DAYS:
Mar 31– 4th Sat Crew
Apr 29 – 4th Sun Crew
Jun 30 – 1st Sat Crew
Jul 29 – 1st Sun Crew
Sep 29 – 2nd Sat Crew
Sep 30 – 2nd Sun Crew
Dec 29 – 3rd Sat
Dec 30 – 3rd Sun POINTS OF CONTACT:

PRESIDENT: John Lubon
SAFETY OFFICER: Kevin Price
DIR OF OPS: Mark Miller
DIR OF FACILITIES: Keith Kilpatrick
BUSINESS MANAGER: Jon Stewart, BusinessManager@nullsoarccsc.com
FREQUENT FLYER EDITOR: Jim Dudley, FrequentFlyer@nullsoarccsc.com Note: See Membership Roster on soarccsc.com for phone numbers and email addresses for all members. Revised 01/04/2018 mkm

3-13-18 Frequent Flyer

Posted Leave a commentPosted in featured, Frequent Flyer

UPCOMING EVENTS

  • Mar 17 Instructor Meeting – 11:00 AM – Tom McDonald
  • Mar 24 Crew Chiefs meeting – 9:30 AM – Mark Miller
  • Apr 7 Board of Directors meeting- 9:30 AM – John Lubon
  • Apr 11 Annual Meeting of SSD dba CCSC & Election – John Lubon
  • Apr 14 Spring Cleanup at CCSC – Keith Kilpatrick
  • Apr 15 Spring Cleanup at CCSC – Keith Kilpatrick
  • Apr 21 Cincinnati Chapter of Ferrari Club of America Event – Maury Drummey
  • Apr 21 Pot Luck Dinner Apr 21 Pot Luck Dinner
  • May 19 WPAFB Airmen Recreation Program event at CCSC – Kevin Price
  • May 20-31 1-26 Championship Contest – Steve Statkus
  • Jun 9 WPAFB Airmen Recreation Program event at CCSC – Kevin Price
  • Jun 16 Cincinnati Chapter of Ferrari Club of America Event – Maury Drummey
  • Jun 16 Pot Luck Dinner Jun 16 Pot Luck Dinner
  • Jul 15-20 YEW 2018 – Steve McManus
  • Aug 3 WPAFB Airmen Recreation Program event at CCSC – Kevin Price
  • August Adult Camp
  • August Sailplane Weight & Balance Party – Chuck Lohre
  • Oct 21 WPAFB Airmen Recreation Program event at CCSC – Kevin Price

SATURDAY CREW REPORT – RICHARD HOLZWARTH 

Finally the field was dry and firm enough and the weather cooperated to permit routine operations on the full length of runway 9. With the first off at 11:05 AM and the last down at 17:45 we had a total of 33 flights. Thanks to Bob Miller for his assistance with annual field checks and training flights.

SUNDAY CREW REPORT – LUCY ANNE MCKOSKY 

It was a beautiful day at the gliderport! We had a total of 17 flights, including several field checks and 1 Flight Review. Thanks to Zack Siefker for his help with instruction.

 

WHICH BADGE DO YOU PLAN TO EARN IN 2018? 

If you do not already have the Silver Badge, by now you should have a plan to earn it. The Gold Badge is next and presents a big increase in the challenge, at least for us in Ohio. The two requirements are a 3,000-meter (9,843-foot) altitude gain and a 300-km (186.4-mile) cross country flight. The 300-km requirement can be fulfilled from CCSC, in fact during 2015 there were 44 flights from CCSC that exceeded 300 km (Don Burns-11, Dan Reagan-10, Joe Simmers-10, John Lubon-8, Dieter Schmidt-3, Jim Price-1, Rolf Hegele-1). If you include flights from Ridge Soaring and Moriarity, CCSC members (the above list plus Mark Miller and Bob Miller) flew a total of 75 flights in excess of 300 km during 2015. One characteristic of these members is that they try to fly whenever the weather is good. If you want to complete the Gold Distance Requirement of 300-km from CCSC a good tactic would be to fly with these members whenever you can. It is a great group with whom to fly. And here is how to know when they are planning to go flying.

 

Now let’s check the fine print: “…a loss of height exceeding 1% of the length of the course will invalidate the soaring performance.” This rule is to prevent you from taking a tow to a high altitude and just gliding down to the finish without ever having to find a thermal. When you do the math you will calculate that you must pull the release below 1,640 AGL for a 50km flight to an airport at exactly the same elevation as the take-off airport. For the CCSC to Fayette County example the actual straight line distance is 58 km if you release directly over CCSC. The field elevation at I23 is 980 MSL. In this case you will have a valid Silver Badge Flight if you release directly above CCSC at 1900 feet above I23, which is 2880 MSL or 1940 feet over CCSC. That could work if you find a thermal when you get to the spillway. Remember to leave a little margin for instrument error either in your altimeter or the Flight Recorder you are using to document the flight. When you talk with some who have completed this requirement in the past you will find that many have chosen to be towed west and either release over Warren County (I68) or release and then fly to Warren County as the starting point and then fly to Fayette County. That makes it a 74 km flight and permits you to release at any altitude up to 3280 MSL so you can have plenty of time to find the first thermal.

There are at least four ways to complete the Silver Distance Task: (1) Straight Out: fly to and land at an airport more than 50 km away as described in the preceding paragraph; (2) Finish Point: You

launch at CCSC and fly to a declared point more than 50 km away (your finish point) and then return and land at CCSC; (3) Start Point, Finish Point at Launching Airport: Fly to a declared start point more than 50 km away and then fly back to land at CCSC; (4) Start Point, Finish Point: Fly to a declared start point (I68), then to a declared finish point (I23) more than 50 km from the declared start point, then land wherever you please, back at CCSC if you can make it, at Fayette County if you want or anyplace else you choose to go if the soaring is so great you do not want to stop.

Notice the key word “declared” in options 2,3 and 4. That means that you have to write down and provide to your official observer in advance the location of the Finish Point and/or Start Point and you have to complete the flight that you declared in advance.

This is the point at which you may want to buy or borrow a copy of Bob Wander’s Badge Soaring: The Silver Badge … Made Easy and become familiar with all the details to assure that your flight fulfills all the requirements for the Silver Badge. Next time we will consider how you are going to prove to the Official Observer and the badge committee that you really did complete the requirements.

BRONZE BADGE QUESTION OF THE WEEK 

Who is responsible for determining if an aircraft is in condition for safe flight?

a) A certificated aircraft mechanic. b) The pilot in command. c) The owner or operator.

See the SSF Study Guide for a practice test with all the questions.

CAESAR CREEK TURKEY SHOOTERS MEMO – STEVE STATKUS 

Well, the Second Saturday Crew demonstrated very clearly, that it’s time to be thinking about gliding and plan on pursuing the Wild Turkey when the leaves are again off the trees. So, clean those blunderbusses and store them until November. As for me, I’m planning a visit to my local gunsmith and talk about the “ultimate solution.”

LEADERS NEEDED

The eleven directors of SSD dba CCSC are elected for three-year terms which are staggered so we need to elect three or four each year at the Annual Meeting on the second Wednesday of April (4/11/2018). This year the terms in office for John Lubon, Tim Christman and Brian Stoops expire, so we need to elect three directors for three-year terms to fill those posiitons. In addition, Steve Statkus has resigned from his position as director so we need to elect one director to finish out the two remaining years of Steve’s term. Brian Stoops has a new job which requires him to work weekends so Brian will not run for reelection as a director. John Lubon and Tim Christman have each agreed to serve an additional 3-year term if reelected, but that still leaves two positions which must be filled by other members. If you would consider contributing your leaership skills to serving the club in this way, please contact John Lubon or any other member of the board and John will add your name to the list of candidates.

There are additional appointed leadership positions which are currently vacant where your skills and interests may match the club needs. Speak with any of the current directors and indicate your willingness to serve.

SPRING CLEAN UP SET FOR APRIL 14th & 15th – KEITH KILPATRICK

In order to keep our club looking pristine spring is a good time to rid our members of cabin fever by getting us outdoors to participate in the annual CCSC spring clean up. As a club member your participation in these biannual events is necessary therefore we will be having this years clean up and beautification over a weekend to accommodate working schedules. There is much needed support to accomplish these tasks so please come out for some fun in sun and maybe get your hands dirty. Lunch and entertainment will be provided. – Keith Kilpatrick

SEEKING TEAM MEMBERS FOR 1-26 CONTEST – STEVE STATKUS

Ladies and gents, I’m entering my 1-26 in the 2018 1-26 championship, but as a team glider. Not a traditional 2 person team but as a multiple pilot team. I’m looking for a minimum of 5 pilots to join TEAM CCSC. We already have a Team Manager and Spiritual Guru; OutLand Bob Root has agreed to provide coaching, leadership, and spiritual guidance to the team. He’s also charged with keeping the beer cooler filled. I’ll cover the entry fee you’ll just pay tow fees to 2 K AGL at the normal club rate. We’ve planned for ten contest days and two practice days so I’d expect each pilot to be ready to fly for two days and retrieve crew for two days. Really we won’t fly 10 days due to weather and pilot fatigue but we’ll accommodate your schedule.

I’ll have my glider ready in March and I’d like each pilot to take a couple of flights to get familiar with the bird and the instrumentation. I’d like each pilot to demonstrate a short field landing also. You don’t have to have 1-26 time in your log book. This Team CCSC is about having FUN and if we come in last lets just get some distance points for bragging rights. ZERO PRESSURE, FUN METER PEGGED AT MAX. – Steve Statkus call sign Buckeye

ANNUAL FIELD FLIGHT REVIEW REQUIRED NOW

Remember that CCSC has a requirement that each member complete a CCSC Field Flight Review with a CCSC instructor and get the instructor’s endorsement in his/her logbook each calendar year prior to acting as PIC of any CCSC glider (UOP 4.2-Pilot Qualifications). Your first CCSC glider flight of the year must be with an instructor. Take advantage of the good winter days ahead to get the requirement completed well in advance of the great spring soaring that is sure to follow. You will want to spend your time soaring then, not waiting for your turn to do the Flight Review. Also, check your logbook. Do you need to complete the FAR 61.56 Flight Review this year? If so, why not combine the two flight reviews and get both completed when they will not interfere with the soaring you want to do during the great weather later this year.

 

HELP FINDING SOMEONE TO SWAP CREW DAY ASSIGNMENTS

A web-based process for facilitating swapping crew day assignments was announced in the 2/21/2017 Frequent Flyer along with instructions for using the system. This process is intended to help members find another member who will agree to swap crew duties for one specific set of dates. It is not for getting reassigned to a different crew for an indefinite period. Mark Miller is now the person who oversees crew assignments, so Mark is the one to whom you need to speak about a long term change.

Remember that UOP 2.2 CREW MEMBER DUTIES states: “All crew members are to report for duty at 9:30 AM and work until released by the Crew Chief. Each crew member is personally responsible for arranging for a qualified substitute in case of his or her absence. Scheduled crew members are expected to be present for each of their scheduled crew days regardless of flying conditions.” This new process does not relieve any crew member from the responsibility for arranging for a qualified substitute and informing the crew chief; rather it is intended to help accomplish that task.

As of 6:00 pm on 2/13/2018 there is one request for a member to swap or substitute a crew day.
Date: 1st Saturday in July 07-07-2018
Skills: Crew
Click Here: Sub/Swap

JONNY STEWART IS NOW SKYDIVE SPORTS!

He is providing a drop off service right here at CCSC. If you need your parachute repacked, just leave it in the CCSC office and fill out one of the service cards and attach it to your rig.
Contact Jonny
Phone: 937-267-1733
Email: skydivesports@nullgmail.com
https: //www.facebook.com/skydivesports/
https://www.instagram.com/skydivesports/

WANTED TO BUY

Open trailer Schweizer, Gehrlein or equivalent. Any condition. Contact: Guy Byars

FOR SALE

ASW 20L $29,000 (Factory L model sold with both 16.59 M wing extensions and M&H winglets) TT 1108 hrs. Komet trailer, Modified Cobra wing tip wheel, tow out bar. Excellent canopy, newer gas spring, older gelcoat. Cambridge L nav, Colibri flight recorder, Dittle ATR720B (old but works good) with new boom mic, Avier with LK-8000. Logs since new. Contact Tony Bonser tbonser@nullcinci.rr.com

Craftsman Snow Blower 22″, Self-propelled, 2-stage, Electric start. $195. Contact Tim Christman (937)475-1445

Schweizer SGS 1-23, S/N 14, MFG Date May1950, includes open trailer. Has won vintage sailplane awards. Contact Thomas G. Bonser.

CCSC MEDIA

Note: See Membership Roster on website for contact information for all members.
CCSC IS ON FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/CaesarCreekSoaringClub
CCSC WEBSITE www.soarccsc.com
MINUTES FROM BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETINGS http://www.soarccsc.com/resources/members/meetingminutes/ (The password is printed on your monthly statement.)

CCSC GROUND CREWS:

1ST SATURDAY
CC: Steve Fenstermaker (cell: 937-581-7713) Tow Pilots: John Armor, CR Gillespie. Instructors: Paul McClaskey, Tom McDonald. Crew: Gerry Daugherty, Mark Hanlon, Joe Jaap, Kevin Price, Dan Beans, Jul Alvarez, D. Mattmuller, B. Sanbongi, A. Quinn, Michael Zengel, Waseem Jamali.

 

1ST SUNDAY – Training Crew
CC: Mike Karraker (cell: 937-830-0627) ACC: Mark Miller. Tow Pilots: Manfred Maurer, Norb Maurer, Dieter Schmidt, Andy Swanson. Instructors: Bob Miller. Crew: Don Burns, Bill Clawson, Christian Maurer, Ethan Maxwell, Eran Moscona, Dave Rawson, Joe Zeis..

2ND SATURDAY
CC: Dick Holzwarth (cell: 937-542-9612) ACC: Jim Marks, Bob Root. Tow Pilots: Haskell Simpkins. Instructors: Bob Anderson, Bill Gabbard, Jim Price. Crew: Bill Hall, Ron Kellerman, Brian Mork, Chloe Williams, Michael Williams.

2ND SUNDAY
CC: Dave Menchen (cell: 513-313-2315) ACC: Lucy Anne McKosky. Tow Pilots: Lorrie Penner, Gordon Penner, Instructors: Jim Goebel, Tom McDonald, Tom Rudolf. Crew: Dave Conrad, Fred Hawk, Dan Katuzienski, Mike McKosky.

3RD SATURDAY
CC: Maury Drummey (cell: 513-871-1998) ACC: Rolf Hegele. Tow Pilots: Don Green, Steve McManus, Dick Scheper.

3RD SUNDAY
CC: Mark Miller (acting) (cell: 513-235-6128) ACC: TBD Tow Pilots: Tony Bonser, Tim Christman. Instructors: Dick Eckels, Crew: Darin Caviness, Otis Lewis, Dan Miner, Tony Rein, Zach Siefker, David Whapham,

4TH SATURDAY
CC: Chuck Lohre (cell: 513-260-9025) ACC: Ethan Saladin. Tow Pilots: Guy Byars, Larry Kirkbride. Instructors: John Atkins, Joe Jackson. Crew: Edgar Byars, Ross Bales, Andrew Dignan, Helen Lohre, Henry Meyerrose, John Murray.

4TH SUNDAY
CC: Steve Statkus (cell: 513-720-8955) ACC: TBD Tow Pilots: Ron Blume, Matt Davis, Tim Morris. Instructors: John Lubon, Kat McManus. Crew: Lynn Alexander, Bill Barone, Mauricio Berrizbeitia, Richard Cedar, Shelby Estell, Jeff Grawe, M. Hosta, Keith Kilpatrick, Dan Reagan, Pete Schradin, Stefano Sinigaglia, Laviniu Tirca John Williams. 2018

5th WEEKEND CREW DAYS:
Mar 31– 4th Sat Crew
Apr 29 – 4th Sun Crew
Jun 30 – 1st Sat Crew
Jul 29 – 1st Sun Crew
Sep 29 – 2nd Sat Crew
Sep 30 – 2nd Sun Crew
Dec 29 – 3rd Sat
Dec 30 – 3rd Sun POINTS OF CONTACT:

PRESIDENT: John Lubon
SAFETY OFFICER: Kevin Price
DIR OF OPS: Mark Miller
DIR OF FACILITIES: Keith Kilpatrick
BUSINESS MANAGER: Jon Stewart, BusinessManager@nullsoarccsc.com
FREQUENT FLYER EDITOR: Jim Dudley, FrequentFlyer@nullsoarccsc.com Note: See Membership Roster on soarccsc.com for phone numbers and email addresses for all members. Revised 01/04/2018 mkm

2-27-2018 Frequent Flyer

Posted Leave a commentPosted in featured, Frequent Flyer

UPCOMING EVENTS

  • Mar 3 Board of Directors meeting- 9:30 AM – John Lubon
  • Apr 7 Board of Directors meeting- 9:30 AM – John Lubon
  • Apr 11 Annual Meeting of SSD dba CCSC & Election – John Lubon
  • Apr 14 Spring Cleanup at CCSC – Keith Kilpatrick
  • Apr 15 Spring Cleanup at CCSC – Keith Kilpatrick
  • Apr 21 Cincinnati Chapter of Ferrari Club of America Event – Maury Drummey
  • Apr 21 Pot Luck Dinner Apr 21 Pot Luck Dinner
  • May 19 WPAFB Airmen Recreation Program event at CCSC – Kevin Price
  • May 20-31 1-26 Championship Contest – Steve Statkus
  • Jun 9 WPAFB Airmen Recreation Program event at CCSC – Kevin Price
  • Jun 16 Cincinnati Chapter of Ferrari Club of America Event – Maury Drummey
  • Jun 16 Pot Luck Dinner Jun 16 Pot Luck Dinner
  • Jul 15-20 YEW 2018 – Steve McManus
  • Aug 3 WPAFB Airmen Recreation Program event at CCSC – Kevin Price
  • August Adult Camp
  • August Sailplane Weight & Balance Party – Chuck Lohre
  • Oct 21 WPAFB Airmen Recreation Program event at CCSC – Kevin Price

CORRECTION: NEW RATINGS IN 2017

• Christian Maurer – Private Glider (F.F. 7/18/17)

• Soren Adams – Private Glider (F.F. 7/18/2017)

• David Whapham – Private Glider (F.F. 8/15/2017)

• Tony Rein – Glider add-on (F.F. 6/6/17)

• Darin Caviness – Private Glider (F.F. 12/5/17)

• Zachary Siefker – Instructor (F.F. 10/17/17)

• Chris Uhl – Instructor ( F.F. 8/22/17)

• Tom O’Berg-Reinstated Glider Flight Instructor (F.F. 8/8/17)

At the Awards Celebration and in the previous Frequent Flyer four of these new ratings from 2017 were inadvertently omitted. Our apologies to those four and congratulations to all of these who achieved new glider pilot ratings in 2017. (The issues of the Frequent Flyer in which each new rating was reported are noted in the parentheses.)

SATURDAY CREW REPORT – CHUCK LOHRE

Wet… Wet… WET! We’ve never seen the field this wet before. We figured that there is a layer of frozen soil preventing the east west drainage on the north side from removing the water. Henry (right), fearless golf cart driver, and I (left) checked out the field and drove around the pond.


The two concrete drains were flowing from the pond. Henry thought that maybe the pond overflow pipe might be plugged a little but water was flowing out.


Ethan Saladin (l.) and Larry Kirkbride (r.) installed the head rests and center back cushion for the Grob 103.
Staring out of the clubhouse through the rain we noticed the wind sock was on the ground, so there was no flying Saturday.

 

SUNDAY CREW REPORT – STEVE STATKUS

I received a phone message from tow pilot Tim Morris on Saturday, 2/24/18, at 2230 hrs: “Just checked my pilot’s license and discovered I am not qualified to fly sea planes, therefore I will not be able to tow for you tomorrow.” After receiving the above call I phoned Chuck Lohre (4th Sat Crew Chief) to get his assessment of the field conditions: “It’s a swamp.” It turned out to be quite wet and soft, but the drainage pipes were flowing at 100% capacity and “the pond should be back to nominal levels by tomorrow” per John Lubon. “All we need is a couple of days of sun and some wind and the field will be good to go,” also per John Lubon our own weather guesser and optimist. Consequently, there was no flight activity, but the Mighty Fourth Sunday Crew did a considerable amount of work. We managed to get the Kobota into the shop for it’s annual inspection by Marty Hosta as well as getting 15H back from the upholstery shop with it’s new interior panels (thanks to Bob Miller and Dan Reagan.) The heaters are turned on in the shop to warm up the fabric and materials so we can apply the final two coats of silver in preparation for applying the color this coming Wednesday. We should have 15H finished with fabric work and out of the shop in three weeks or so, but can move it out sooner if the G102 needs to get started on it’s annual. – Steve Statkus

CONGRATULATIONS TYLER DOCKUM

Tyler Dockum got his initial flight training at CCSC starting with Youth Camp. That helped him win an appointment to the Air Force Academy and gave him a good foundation on which to build his piloting skills. Tyler has maintained his membership in CCSC in order to be able to fly gliders on his visits home from the Academy.

At the Academy Tyler has been preparing to fly some very powerful aircraft.

Congratulations Tyler.

WHICH BADGE DO YOU PLAN TO EARN IN 2018?

In prior issues the requirements for the Silver Badge have been introduced. This time let’s look more closely at the Silver Distance Requirement. A great way to prepare for this flight is to practice flying the triangle with CCSC, Warren County (I68) and Dayton-Wright Brothers (MGY) as the turn points. The total distance around that triangle is very close to the 50 kilometers required for the “Distance” portion of the Silver Badge. A big difference is that for the Silver Badge the 50 kilometers must be a straight line distance. So pull out your sectional chart and look for an airport that is at least 50 kilometers away from CCSC. How about Fayette County (I23)? It is a little over 50 km away and if you stay to the north of the Wilmington Class D airspace there are airports which might work as alternates in case the lift disappears.

Now let’s check the fine print: “…a loss of height exceeding 1% of the length of the course will invalidate the soaring performance.” This rule is to prevent you from taking a tow to a high altitude and just gliding down to the finish without ever having to find a thermal. When you do the math you will calculate that you must pull the release below 1,640 AGL for a 50km flight to an airport at exactly the same elevation as the take-off airport. For the CCSC to Fayette County example the actual straight line distance is 58 km if you release directly over CCSC. The field elevation at I23 is 980 MSL. In this case you will have a valid Silver Badge Flight if you release directly above CCSC at 1900 feet above I23, which is 2880 MSL or 1940 feet over CCSC. That could work if you find a thermal when you get to the spillway. Remember to leave a little margin for instrument error either in your altimeter or the Flight Recorder you are using to document the flight. When you talk with some who have completed this requirement in the past you will find that many have chosen to be towed west and either release over Warren County (I68) or release and then fly to Warren County as the starting point and then fly to Fayette County. That makes it a 74 km flight and permits you to release at any altitude up to 3280 MSL so you can have plenty of time to find the first thermal.

There are at least four ways to complete the Silver Distance Task: (1) Straight Out: fly to and land at an airport more than 50 km away as described in the preceding paragraph; (2) Finish Point: You

launch at CCSC and fly to a declared point more than 50 km away (your finish point) and then return and land at CCSC; (3) Start Point, Finish Point at Launching Airport: Fly to a declared start point more than 50 km away and then fly back to land at CCSC; (4) Start Point, Finish Point: Fly to a declared start point (I68), then to a declared finish point (I23) more than 50 km from the declared start point, then land wherever you please, back at CCSC if you can make it, at Fayette County if you want or anyplace else you choose to go if the soaring is so great you do not want to stop.

Notice the key word “declared” in options 2,3 and 4. That means that you have to write down and provide to your official observer in advance the location of the Finish Point and/or Start Point and you have to complete the flight that you declared in advance.

This is the point at which you may want to buy or borrow a copy of Bob Wander’s Badge Soaring: The Silver Badge … Made Easy and become familiar with all the details to assure that your flight fulfills all the requirements for the Silver Badge. Next time we will consider how you are going to prove to the Official Observer and the badge committee that you really did complete the requirements.

 

BRONZE BADGE QUESTION OF THE WEEK

In addition to a valid Airworthiness Certificate, what documents or records must be aboard an aircraft during flight?

a) Aircraft engine and airframe logbooks, and owner’s manual. b) Radio operator’s permit, and repair and alteration forms. c) Operating limitations and Registration Certificate.

See the SSF Study Guide for a practice test with all the questions.

GROB-102 PLAN FOR 2018 – UNLIMITED FLIGHTS FOR SINGLE A/C USE FEE

The board approved treating the Grob-102 in the same manner as for the past three years, so if you want to take best advantage of BG in 2018 you want to declare that desire and sign up. Everyone who wants to fly BG is asked sign up and prepay $90. For the rest of the year those members may fly up to 2-hour blocks as many times as they want with no additional Aircraft Use Fee. Other members will be charged $25 for each Aircraft Use and will be limited to 1-hour blocks. The Hook-up Fee, Basic Tow Fee and Altitude Index Fee will follow the Schedule of Fees and Dues for all pilots, only the Aircraft Use Fee and the flight duration limit are different.

This will be a big help if your goal is the C badge (solo flight exceeding 60 minutes) or Bronze badge (at least 10 flights in a single-place glider with at least two flights having a duration of two hours or more) or the silver badge. If you want to fly the G-102 more than four times or for flights lasting more than an hour with no additional Aircraft Use Fee in 2018 it is to your advantage to declare that desire by email to Jim Dudley. The $90 G-102 Fee will appear on your March statement, payable by March 31.

 

LEADERS NEEDED

The eleven directors of SSD dba CCSC are elected for three-year terms which are staggered so we need to elect three or four each year at the Annual Meeting on the second Wednesday of April (4/11/2018). This year the terms in office for John Lubon, Tim Christman and Brian Stoops expire, so we need to elect three directors for three-year terms to fill those posiitons. In addition, Steve Statkus has resigned from his position as director so we need to elect one director to finish out the two remaining years of Steve’s term. Brian Stoops has a new job which requires him to work weekends so Brian will not run for reelection as a director. John Lubon and Tim Christman have each agreed to serve an additional 3-year term if reelected, but that still leaves two positions which must be filled by other members. If you would consider contributing your leaership skills to serving the club in this way, please contact John Lubon or any other member of the board and John will add your name to the list of candidates.

There are additional appointed leadership positions which are currently vacant where your skills and interests may match the club needs. Speak with any of the current directors and indicate your willingness to serve.

SPRING CLEAN UP SET FOR APRIL 14th & 15th – KEITH KILPATRICK

In order to keep our club looking pristine spring is a good time to rid our members of cabin fever by getting us outdoors to participate in the annual CCSC spring clean up. As a club member your participation in these biannual events is necessary therefore we will be having this years clean up and beautification over a weekend to accommodate working schedules. There is much needed support to accomplish these tasks so please come out for some fun in sun and maybe get your hands dirty. Lunch and entertainment will be provided. – Keith Kilpatrick

SEEKING TEAM MEMBERS FOR 1-26 CONTEST – STEVE STATKUS

Ladies and gents, I’m entering my 1-26 in the 2018 1-26 championship, but as a team glider. Not a traditional 2 person team but as a multiple pilot team. I’m looking for a minimum of 5 pilots to join TEAM CCSC. We already have a Team Manager and Spiritual Guru; OutLand Bob Root has agreed to provide coaching, leadership, and spiritual guidance to the team. He’s also charged with keeping the beer cooler filled. I’ll cover the entry fee you’ll just pay tow fees to 2 K AGL at the normal club rate. We’ve planned for ten contest days and two practice days so I’d expect each pilot to be ready to fly for two days and retrieve crew for two days. Really we won’t fly 10 days due to weather and pilot fatigue but we’ll accommodate your schedule.

I’ll have my glider ready in March and I’d like each pilot to take a couple of flights to get familiar with the bird and the instrumentation. I’d like each pilot to demonstrate a short field landing also. You don’t have to have 1-26 time in your log book. This Team CCSC is about having FUN and if we come in last lets just get some distance points for bragging rights. ZERO PRESSURE, FUN METER PEGGED AT MAX. – Steve Statkus call sign Buckeye

ANNUAL FIELD FLIGHT REVIEW REQUIRED NOW

Remember that CCSC has a requirement that each member complete a CCSC Field Flight Review with a CCSC instructor and get the instructor’s endorsement in his/her logbook each calendar year prior to acting as PIC of any CCSC glider (UOP 4.2-Pilot Qualifications). Your first CCSC glider flight of the year must be with an instructor. Take advantage of the good winter days ahead to get the requirement completed well in advance of the great spring soaring that is sure to follow. You will want to spend your time soaring then, not waiting for your turn to do the Flight Review. Also, check your logbook. Do you need to complete the FAR 61.56 Flight Review this year? If so, why not combine the two flight reviews and get both completed when they will not interfere with the soaring you want to do during the great weather later this year.

UOP REVISION PROPOSED – SUBMIT YOUR COMMENT NOW

A new review and comment period is under way for a change to the January 2018 version of the UOP such that section 8.11 will be worded as proposed and approved by the Board at the December meeting:
8.11 ALTERNATE FIELD USAGE
The runway is primarily for flying sailplanes. Alternate use for such activities as model airplane flying, etc. is permitted only when sailplane operations are not in progress. Sailplane flying ALWAYS preempts any other activity.
HUNTING AND FIREARMS
Hunting or discharging firearms (target practice) on the gliderport property is not permitted.
FIREWORKS
Use of fireworks is not permitted.
Your written comments are welcome. Please submit them to any board member prior to the March 3, 2018 meeting of the Board.

HELP FINDING SOMEONE TO SWAP CREW DAY ASSIGNMENTS

A web-based process for facilitating swapping crew day assignments was announced in the 2/21/2017 Frequent Flyer along with instructions for using the system. This process is intended to help members find another member who will agree to swap crew duties for one specific set of dates. It is not for getting reassigned to a different crew for an indefinite period. Mark Miller is now the person who oversees crew assignments, so Mark is the one to whom you need to speak about a long term change.

Remember that UOP 2.2 CREW MEMBER DUTIES states: “All crew members are to report for duty at 9:30 AM and work until released by the Crew Chief. Each crew member is personally responsible for arranging for a qualified substitute in case of his or her absence. Scheduled crew members are expected to be present for each of their scheduled crew days regardless of flying conditions.” This new process does not relieve any crew member from the responsibility for arranging for a qualified substitute and informing the crew chief; rather it is intended to help accomplish that task.

As of 6:00 pm on 2/13/2018 there is one request for a member to swap or substitute a crew day.
Date: 1st Saturday in July 07-07-2018
Skills: Crew
Click Here: Sub/Swap

JONNY STEWART IS NOW SKYDIVE SPORTS!

He is providing a drop off service right here at CCSC. If you need your parachute repacked, just leave it in the CCSC office and fill out one of the service cards and attach it to your rig.
Contact Jonny
Phone: 937-267-1733
Email: skydivesports@nullgmail.com
https: //www.facebook.com/skydivesports/
https://www.instagram.com/skydivesports/

WANTED TO BUY

Open trailer Schweizer, Gehrlein or equivalent. Any condition. Contact: Guy Byars

FOR SALE

ASW 20L $29,000 (Factory L model sold with both 16.59 M wing extensions and M&H winglets) TT 1108 hrs. Komet trailer, Modified Cobra wing tip wheel, tow out bar. Excellent canopy, newer gas spring, older gelcoat. Cambridge L nav, Colibri flight recorder, Dittle ATR720B (old but works good) with new boom mic, Avier with LK-8000. Logs since new. Contact Tony Bonser tbonser@nullcinci.rr.com

Craftsman Snow Blower 22″, Self-propelled, 2-stage, Electric start. $195. Contact Tim Christman (937)475-1445

Schweizer SGS 1-23, S/N 14, MFG Date May1950, includes open trailer. Has won vintage sailplane awards. Contact Thomas G. Bonser.

CCSC MEDIA

Note: See Membership Roster on website for contact information for all members.
CCSC IS ON FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/CaesarCreekSoaringClub
CCSC WEBSITE www.soarccsc.com
MINUTES FROM BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETINGS http://www.soarccsc.com/resources/members/meetingminutes/ (The password is printed on your monthly statement.)

CCSC GROUND CREWS:

1ST SATURDAY
CC: Steve Fenstermaker (cell: 937-581-7713) Tow Pilots: John Armor, CR Gillespie. Instructors: Paul McClaskey, Tom McDonald. Crew: Gerry Daugherty, Mark Hanlon, Joe Jaap, Kevin Price, Dan Beans, Jul Alvarez, D. Mattmuller, B. Sanbongi, A. Quinn, Michael Zengel, Waseem Jamali.

1ST SUNDAY – Training Crew
CC: Mike Karraker (cell: 937-830-0627) ACC: Mark Miller. Tow Pilots: Manfred Maurer, Norb Maurer, Dieter Schmidt, Andy Swanson. Instructors: Bob Miller. Crew: Don Burns, Bill Clawson, Christian Maurer, Ethan Maxwell, Eran Moscona, Dave Rawson, Joe Zeis..

2ND SATURDAY
CC: Dick Holzwarth (cell: 937-542-9612) ACC: Jim Marks, Bob Root. Tow Pilots: Haskell Simpkins. Instructors: Bob Anderson, Bill Gabbard, Jim Price. Crew: Bill Hall, Ron Kellerman, Brian Mork, Chloe Williams, Michael Williams.

2ND SUNDAY
CC: Dave Menchen (cell: 513-313-2315) ACC: Lucy Anne McKosky. Tow Pilots: Lorrie Penner, Gordon Penner, Instructors: Jim Goebel, Tom McDonald, Tom Rudolf. Crew: Dave Conrad, Fred Hawk, Dan Katuzienski, Mike McKosky.

3RD SATURDAY
CC: Maury Drummey (cell: 513-871-1998) ACC: Rolf Hegele. Tow Pilots: Don Green, Steve McManus, Dick Scheper.

3RD SUNDAY
CC: Mark Miller (acting) (cell: 513-235-6128) ACC: TBD Tow Pilots: Tony Bonser, Tim Christman. Instructors: Dick Eckels, Crew: Darin Caviness, Otis Lewis, Dan Miner, Tony Rein, Zach Siefker, David Whapham,

4TH SATURDAY
CC: Chuck Lohre (cell: 513-260-9025) ACC: Ethan Saladin. Tow Pilots: Guy Byars, Larry Kirkbride. Instructors: John Atkins, Joe Jackson. Crew: Edgar Byars, Ross Bales, Andrew Dignan, Helen Lohre, Henry Meyerrose, John Murray.

4TH SUNDAY
CC: Steve Statkus (cell: 513-720-8955) ACC: TBD Tow Pilots: Ron Blume, Matt Davis, Tim Morris. Instructors: John Lubon, Kat McManus. Crew: Lynn Alexander, Bill Barone, Mauricio Berrizbeitia, Richard Cedar, Shelby Estell, Jeff Grawe, M. Hosta, Keith Kilpatrick, Dan Reagan, Pete Schradin, Stefano Sinigaglia, Laviniu Tirca John Williams. 2018

5th WEEKEND CREW DAYS:
Mar 31– 4th Sat Crew
Apr 29 – 4th Sun Crew
Jun 30 – 1st Sat Crew
Jul 29 – 1st Sun Crew
Sep 29 – 2nd Sat Crew
Sep 30 – 2nd Sun Crew
Dec 29 – 3rd Sat
Dec 30 – 3rd Sun POINTS OF CONTACT:

PRESIDENT: John Lubon
SAFETY OFFICER: Kevin Price
DIR OF OPS: Mark Miller
DIR OF FACILITIES: Keith Kilpatrick
BUSINESS MANAGER: Jon Stewart, BusinessManager@nullsoarccsc.com
FREQUENT FLYER EDITOR: Jim Dudley, FrequentFlyer@nullsoarccsc.com Note: See Membership Roster on soarccsc.com for phone numbers and email addresses for all members. Revised 01/04/2018 mkm

2018 Tow Pilot of the Year Don Green

Feb 20, 2018 Frequent Flyer

Posted Leave a commentPosted in featured

UPCOMING EVENTS

  • Mar 3 Board of Directors meeting- 9:30 AM – John Lubon
  • Apr 7 Board of Directors meeting- 9:30 AM – John Lubon
  • Apr 11 Annual Meeting of SSD dba CCSC & Election – John Lubon
  • Apr 14 Spring Cleanup at CCSC – Keith Kilpatrick
  • Apr 15 Spring Cleanup at CCSC – Keith Kilpatrick
  • Apr 21 Cincinnati Chapter of Ferrari Club of America Event – Maury Drummey
  • Apr 21 Pot Luck Dinner Apr 21 Pot Luck Dinner
  • May 19 WPAFB Airmen Recreation Program event at CCSC – Kevin Price
  • May 20-31 1-26 Championship Contest – Steve Statkus
  • Jun 9 WPAFB Airmen Recreation Program event at CCSC – Kevin Price
  • Jun 16 Cincinnati Chapter of Ferrari Club of America Event – Maury Drummey
  • Jun 16 Pot Luck Dinner Jun 16 Pot Luck Dinner
  • Jul 15-20 YEW 2018 – Steve McManus
  • Aug 3 WPAFB Airmen Recreation Program event at CCSC – Kevin Price
  • August Adult Camp
  • August Sailplane Weight & Balance Party – Chuck Lohre
  • Oct 21 WPAFB Airmen Recreation Program event at CCSC – Kevin Price

ANNUAL AWARDS CELEBRATION AND BANQUET

Our club has a tradition of celebrating the soaring achievements of members at a great banquet and we are pretty good at guessing when it will snow to create the traditional environment for the event. This past Saturday the weather appeared to be trying to play its normal game with us but the snow had disappeared by banquet time and did not impact the fun. Although it was chilly, there were many February 20, 2018 members who chose Valley Vinyards outdoor grill to cook their steak or salmon just the way they wanted it. Members and guests arrived for the social hour and John Lubon faced a very difficult challenge interrupting all the lively conversations and getting the group’s attention for the awards ceremony.

After a brief review of some of the contributions from members that help make and keep CCSC a heathy strong club (now one of the top three clubs in the nation) John used OLC results to show that our pilots also know how to soar. Although CCSC ended up 16th in North America in the 2017 OLC Club ranking that John showed, our pilots did well compared with the other 1400 North American pilots who participated in the 2017 contest, especially considering the weather and soaring conditions in Ohio in 2017. Dan Reagan topped the list of 18 CCSC pilots who submitted flights to OLC in 2017. He submitted 29 flights to OLC with a combined total of 139 hours flight time! That got Dan the 17th place ranking out of 1400 pilots in North America in the Champion OLC 2017 contest. At this point Dan is ranked 3rd in the Champion OLC 2018 contest. The achievements of the 18 CCSC pilots who submitted flights to OLC provided the right background for Tom McDonald’s presentation about the cross country training program which is being developed for CCSC members. (See Tom’s article on pages 7-8 and expect to read more about the cross country training initiative in forthcoming newsletters.) Bob Miller then showed scenes from his soaring adventures in New Zealand early in 2017. With that look at where cross country soaring skills can take a pilot attention turned to club awards.

Youth/Student Member with Most Flights

The Youth/Student pilots with the most flights in 2017 were: 1. Alex Teffenhardt – 33 flights 9shown), 2. Ethan Maxwell – 26 flights, 3. Micah Ferguson – 24 flights

Tow Pilot with Most Launches: Don Green

2018 Tow Pilot of the Year Don Green

Again Don Green topped the list of most active tow pilots: 1. Don Green – 230 tows, 2. Larry Kirkbride – 119 tows, 3. Dick Scheper – 118 tows. Thanks to all our tow pilots for their service to the club!

New Ratings in 2017 

• Zachary Siefker – Instructor

• Chris Uhl – Instructor

• Tony Rein – Glider Rating

• Darin Caviness – Glider Rating

Most Active Instructors in 2017 

1. Bob Miller – 135 instructional flights

2. Bill Gabbard – 92 instructional flights

3. Larry Kirkbride – 75 instructional flights

Adult Member with Most Flights in 2017 

1. Darin Caviness –

2. Joe Jaap – 50 flights

3. Tony Rein – 44 flights

Crew with Most Launches in 2017 

1. 2nd Saturday – 207 launches

2. 2nd Sunday – 199 launches

3. 1st Sunday – 187 launches

Trustee Award 

It was announced that Tim Christman is the recipient of the Trustee Award this year. Unfortunately Tim was not present to receive the award. The current plan is to present the award to Tim at the meeting of the Board of Directors on March 3, 2018. Tim is a long time member of CCSC and has served the club in many roles, most recently as a Director overseeing the maintenance of our fleet of tow planes and coordinating the efforts of our tow pilots. When you see Tim be sure to thank him for his contribution to making this a great club.

THIRD SUNDAY CREW REPORT – TONY REIN

Eight members of the Third Sunday crew showed up and went to work on the annual inspection and servicing of our fleet of golf carts. There were no flights due to wet field conditions.

WHICH BADGE DO YOU PLAN TO EARN IN 2018?

In prior issues there has been discussion of the A, B, C, and Bronze badges. If you do not have all of these already, hopefully you are formulating your plan to get each of them this year. Discussion of the Silver Badge was started with an overview of the requirements: Silver Altitude is a 1,000-meter (3,281-foot) altitude gain above an in-flight low point; Silver Duration is a 5-hour flight time after tow release and Silver Distance is a 50-km (31.07 mile) cross country flight.

Exactly what do you have to do to complete the Silver Duration requirement? Well, for one thing the time starts at release, not at the start of the tow. After release you need to fly for at least 5 hours. Your release altitude must be not more than 1000 meters (3,281 feet) above the finish point, i.e. you can take a 3,000 foot tow, but that’s all. Keep the extra 281 feet in reserve for instrument error, etc.

What evidence do you need to provide about the release altitude and the time between release and landing? It is acceptable to find an Official Observer (person with at least a B badge who is familiar with the F.A.I rules) and remain within that observer’s sight for the full time and have the tow pilot confirm to the official observer at what altitude you released. Most will prefer to use a recording device to document those details rather than to risk a friendship. You will still need an official observer to certify your flight. He must certify the recorder data (that the recorder was in the airplane with you and only you were in the airplane, the data had not been tampered with, etc.) More on recorders in a future edition.

Start planning now about how you will complete the Silver Badge 5-hour duration flight this year.

BRONZE BADGE QUESTION OF THE WEEK

How many statute miles will a glider with a 30:1 glide ratio travel for each 1000 feet of altitude loss?

a) 30 miles, b) 3 miles, c) 5.7 miles, d) 0.57 miles

See the SSF Study Guide for a practice test with all the questions.

GROB-102 PLAN FOR 2018 – UNLIMITED FLIGHTS FOR SINGLE A/C USE FEE

The board approved treating the Grob-102 in the same manner as for the past three years, so if you want to take best advantage of BG in 2018 you want to declare that desire and sign up. Everyone who wants to fly BG is asked sign up and prepay $90. For the rest of the year those members may fly up to 2-hour blocks as many times as they want with no additional Aircraft Use Fee. Other members will be charged $25 for each Aircraft Use and will be limited to 1-hour blocks. The Hook-up Fee, Basic Tow Fee and Altitude Index Fee will follow the Schedule of Fees and Dues for all pilots, only the Aircraft Use Fee and the flight duration limit are different.

This will be a big help if your goal is the C badge (solo flight exceeding 60 minutes) or Bronze badge (at least 10 flights in a single-place glider with at least two flights having a duration of two hours or more) or the silver badge. If you want to fly the G-102 more than four times or for flights lasting more than an hour with no additional Aircraft Use Fee in 2018 it is to your advantage to declare that desire by email to Jim Dudley. The $90 G-102 Fee will appear on your March statement, payable by March 31.

BEYOND SOLO – STAYING MOTIVATED, GETTING LICENSED

By Tom McDonald

(We have a problem at CCSC turning solo students into licensed pilots. This is not unique to gliders or just to our club. It is common to most flight schools. 

A version of the following article appeared in the magazine AOPA Flight Training in 2010, detailing how we improved our completion rate at a flight school I ran some 35 years ago. I have inserted a few [notes] not in the original piece that may apply more directly to CCSC. 

In the next Frequent Flyer: the details of our proposed cross country training program, including limited solo cross-country flights.)

We have a problem at CCSC turning solo students into licensed pilots. This is not unique to gliders or just to our club. It is common to most flight schools.

A version of the following article appeared in the magazine AOPA Flight Training in 2010, detailing how we improved our completion rate at a flight school I ran some 35 years ago. I have inserted a few [notes] not in the original piece that may apply more directly to CCSC.

In the next Frequent Flyer: the details of our proposed cross country training program, including limited solo cross-country flights.

The rarely-used ARINC radio on a Louisiana FBO counter blared to life on a sunny February morning in 1984. It was Carl, one of my students. He was on his first solo to do airwork in the practice area and he had a question.

“I’ve done all the maneuvers twice: stalls, slow flight, steep turns, ground reference, you name it. I’ve got the plane signed out for another 40 minutes. What do I do next?”

We chuckled about it a bit in the office before I suggested to Carl that he fly around the edge of our practice area and enjoy the view, get a couple more landings and call it a day.

Carl was one of my first students, and I soon learned that his question was far from unique. (No one else ever called in to talk it over on the radio, though). Many people experienced a post-solo letdown, I had a difficult time keeping some in the airplane long enough to finish their private license. This was bad for business and a disappointment for the students who drifted away.

For some, flying solo was the goal. Once they had done that, the money and work to get licensed became too much. These people moved on to other pursuits and I couldn’t fault them. They had met their objective, flying a Cessna 150 by themselves, after all.

For others, a lack of focus and targets between first solo and the start of cross-country work was the problem. Students often proved unprepared for the first cross-country training flight. [CCSC students tend to be under prepared for the cross-country portion of the oral exam, never mind the actual flying]. The issue here was that cross country work introduced all at once [or not training it in gliders at all] was a classic example of an oversized problem.

I needed a plan to bridge these gaps.

The prescription 

Cross-country flight can be simulated, in a sense, by flying to nearby airports. This breaks cross-country work into smaller pieces, separating flight to other airports from most of the navigation problem.

Four other airports were close to our Monroe, Louisiana operation: Morehouse, Hooks, Caldwell Parish and Union Parish. I decided to use these nearby fields to add some structure to the program, and eventually settled on this post-solo curriculum. I have modified the curriculum and endorsement sequence a bit to reflect today’s regulations, which have changed since the eighties.

First, we went dual to Caldwell, Union and back to MLU. Along the way we introduced sectional charts, weather reports, uncontrolled airports, and the rest of the 61.93 (e) requirements not covered in pre-solo training. We were able to do this in a low-stress environment (and save training time and money) because the distances involved were short.

I then endorsed the student for solo cross-country per 61.93 (2) (i), but with a restriction to flights between MLU and the four airports mentioned. Students were then endorsed for two solo flights, one to Union Parish, Morehouse and back, then one Caldwell, Hooks and back. In each case, they first saw an airport we had been to dual, and then saw another for the first time. The second leg went through our familiar practice areas, greatly reducing the navigation stress. (Note that 61.93 (b) (1) could not be used, even though the airports were within 25 nm. I had not provided instruction in both directions over the route, and the purpose of the flight was more than landing practice.)

We also went dual to Morehouse for at least nine night landings between the student solo flight there and the start of “real” cross-country work. The rest of the night hour requirement, and the 10th landing, came on the dual cross-country. [No night landing in a glider, of course. Also, we will endorse each solo X/C flight individually. Don’t panic. While we will do the Lebanon – Dayton Wright – CCSC triangle for training, we’re only sending students to Cubby’s and back by themselves]. 

Results 

Students were better prepared for true cross country, to the point where I could almost always upgrade the restricted endorsement after just one dual flight of a couple of hundred miles, while two flights were usually needed before. Rarely did a cross-country student arrive over the destination still at cruise altitude, use an improper pattern entry or commit other common errors.

Having this series of intermediate steps to cross-country flying had other advantages. Our flight school completion rate went up. It was easier to keep students motivated with attainable intermediate goals from first solo to solo cross-country through checkride prep and signoff. Solo students no longer asked, “What do I do next?”

Carl, the first to ask me that question, finished his rating on schedule. He moved quickly from first solo in February to passing his private pilot check on the first attempt in April. He also accidentally taught himself spin recoveries sometime in March, but that’s for another article.

LEADERS NEEDED

The eleven directors of SSD dba CCSC are elected for three-year terms which are staggered so we need to elect three or four each year at the Annual Meeting on the second Wednesday of April (4/11/2018). This year the terms in office for John Lubon, Tim Christman and Brian Stoops expire, so we need to elect three directors for three-year terms to fill those posiitons. In addition, Steve Statkus has resigned from his position as director so we need to elect one director to finish out the two remaining years of Steve’s term. Brian Stoops has a new job which requires him to work weekends so Brian will not run for reelection as a director. John Lubon and Tim Christman have each agreed to serve an additional 3-year term if reelected, but that still leaves two positions which must be filled by other members. If you would consider contributing your leaership skills to serving the club in this way, please contact John Lubon or any other member of the board and John will add your name to the list of candidates.

There are additional appointed leadership positions which are currently vacant where your skills and interests may match the club needs. Speak with any of the current directors and indicate your willingness to serve.

SPRING CLEAN UP SET FOR APRIL 14th & 15th – KEITH KILPATRICK

In order to keep our club looking pristine spring is a good time to rid our members of cabin fever by getting us outdoors to participate in the annual CCSC spring clean up. As a club member your participation in these biannual events is necessary therefore we will be having this years clean up and beautification over a weekend to accommodate working schedules. There is much needed support to accomplish these tasks so please come out for some fun in sun and maybe get your hands dirty. Lunch and entertainment will be provided. – Keith Kilpatrick

SEEKING TEAM MEMBERS FOR 1-26 CONTEST – STEVE STATKUS

Ladies and gents, I’m entering my 1-26 in the 2018 1-26 championship, but as a team glider. Not a traditional 2 person team but as a multiple pilot team. I’m looking for a minimum of 5 pilots to join TEAM CCSC. We already have a Team Manager and Spiritual Guru; OutLand Bob Root has agreed to provide coaching, leadership, and spiritual guidance to the team. He’s also charged with keeping the beer cooler filled. I’ll cover the entry fee you’ll just pay tow fees to 2 K AGL at the normal club rate. We’ve planned for ten contest days and two practice days so I’d expect each pilot to be ready to fly for two days and retrieve crew for two days. Really we won’t fly 10 days due to weather and pilot fatigue but we’ll accommodate your schedule.

I’ll have my glider ready in March and I’d like each pilot to take a couple of flights to get familiar with the bird and the instrumentation. I’d like each pilot to demonstrate a short field landing also. You don’t have to have 1-26 time in your log book. This Team CCSC is about having FUN and if we come in last lets just get some distance points for bragging rights. ZERO PRESSURE, FUN METER PEGGED AT MAX. – Steve Statkus call sign Buckeye

ANNUAL FIELD FLIGHT REVIEW REQUIRED NOW

Remember that CCSC has a requirement that each member complete a CCSC Field Flight Review with a CCSC instructor and get the instructor’s endorsement in his/her logbook each calendar year prior to acting as PIC of any CCSC glider (UOP 4.2-Pilot Qualifications). Your first CCSC glider flight of the year must be with an instructor. Take advantage of the good winter days ahead to get the requirement completed well in advance of the great spring soaring that is sure to follow. You will want to spend your time soaring then, not waiting for your turn to do the Flight Review. Also, check your logbook. Do you need to complete the FAR 61.56 Flight Review this year? If so, why not combine the two flight reviews and get both completed when they will not interfere with the soaring you want to do during the great weather later this year.

UOP REVISION PROPOSED – SUBMIT YOUR COMMENT NOW

A new review and comment period is under way for a change to the January 2018 version of the UOP such that section 8.11 will be worded as proposed and approved by the Board at the December meeting:
8.11 ALTERNATE FIELD USAGE
The runway is primarily for flying sailplanes. Alternate use for such activities as model airplane flying, etc. is permitted only when sailplane operations are not in progress. Sailplane flying ALWAYS preempts any other activity.
HUNTING AND FIREARMS
Hunting or discharging firearms (target practice) on the gliderport property is not permitted.
FIREWORKS
Use of fireworks is not permitted.
Your written comments are welcome. Please submit them to any board member prior to the March 3, 2018 meeting of the Board.

HELP FINDING SOMEONE TO SWAP CREW DAY ASSIGNMENTS

A web-based process for facilitating swapping crew day assignments was announced in the 2/21/2017 Frequent Flyer along with instructions for using the system. This process is intended to help members find another member who will agree to swap crew duties for one specific set of dates. It is not for getting reassigned to a different crew for an indefinite period. Mark Miller is now the person who oversees crew assignments, so Mark is the one to whom you need to speak about a long term change.

Remember that UOP 2.2 CREW MEMBER DUTIES states: “All crew members are to report for duty at 9:30 AM and work until released by the Crew Chief. Each crew member is personally responsible for arranging for a qualified substitute in case of his or her absence. Scheduled crew members are expected to be present for each of their scheduled crew days regardless of flying conditions.” This new process does not relieve any crew member from the responsibility for arranging for a qualified substitute and informing the crew chief; rather it is intended to help accomplish that task.

As of 6:00 pm on 2/13/2018 there is one request for a member to swap or substitute a crew day.
Date: 1st Saturday in July 07-07-2018
Skills: Crew
Click Here: Sub/Swap

JONNY STEWART IS NOW SKYDIVE SPORTS!

He is providing a drop off service right here at CCSC. If you need your parachute repacked, just leave it in the CCSC office and fill out one of the service cards and attach it to your rig.
Contact Jonny
Phone: 937-267-1733
Email: skydivesports@nullgmail.com
https: //www.facebook.com/skydivesports/
https://www.instagram.com/skydivesports/

WANTED TO BUY

Open trailer Schweizer, Gehrlein or equivalent. Any condition. Contact: Guy Byars

FOR SALE

Craftsman Snow Blower 22″, Self-propelled, 2-stage, Electric start. $195. Contact Tim Christman (937)475-1445
Schweizer SGS 1-23, S/N 14, MFG Date May1950, includes open trailer. Has won vintage sailplane awards. Contact Thomas G. Bonser.

CCSC MEDIA

Note: See Membership Roster on website for contact information for all members.
CCSC IS ON FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/CaesarCreekSoaringClub
CCSC WEBSITE www.soarccsc.com
MINUTES FROM BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETINGS http://www.soarccsc.com/resources/members/meetingminutes/ (The password is printed on your monthly statement.)

CCSC GROUND CREWS:

1ST SATURDAY
CC: Steve Fenstermaker (cell: 937-581-7713) Tow Pilots: John Armor, CR Gillespie. Instructors: Paul McClaskey, Tom McDonald. Crew: Gerry Daugherty, Mark Hanlon, Joe Jaap, Kevin Price, Dan Beans, Jul Alvarez, D. Mattmuller, B. Sanbongi, A. Quinn, Michael Zengel, Waseem Jamali.

1ST SUNDAY – Training Crew
CC: Mike Karraker (cell: 937-830-0627) ACC: Mark Miller. Tow Pilots: Manfred Maurer, Norb Maurer, Dieter Schmidt, Andy Swanson. Instructors: Bob Miller. Crew: Don Burns, Bill Clawson, Christian Maurer, Ethan Maxwell, Eran Moscona, Dave Rawson, Joe Zeis..

2ND SATURDAY
CC: Dick Holzwarth (cell: 937-542-9612) ACC: Jim Marks, Bob Root. Tow Pilots: Haskell Simpkins. Instructors: Bob Anderson, Bill Gabbard, Jim Price. Crew: Bill Hall, Ron Kellerman, Brian Mork, Chloe Williams, Michael Williams.

2ND SUNDAY
CC: Dave Menchen (cell: 513-313-2315) ACC: Lucy Anne McKosky. Tow Pilots: Lorrie Penner, Gordon Penner, Instructors: Jim Goebel, Tom McDonald, Tom Rudolf. Crew: Dave Conrad, Fred Hawk, Dan Katuzienski, Mike McKosky.

3RD SATURDAY
CC: Maury Drummey (cell: 513-871-1998) ACC: Rolf Hegele. Tow Pilots: Don Green, Steve McManus, Dick Scheper.

3RD SUNDAY
CC: Mark Miller (acting) (cell: 513-235-6128) ACC: TBD Tow Pilots: Tony Bonser, Tim Christman. Instructors: Dick Eckels, Crew: Darin Caviness, Otis Lewis, Dan Miner, Tony Rein, Zach Siefker, David Whapham,

4TH SATURDAY
CC: Chuck Lohre (cell: 513-260-9025) ACC: Ethan Saladin. Tow Pilots: Guy Byars, Larry Kirkbride. Instructors: John Atkins, Joe Jackson. Crew: Edgar Byars, Ross Bales, Andrew Dignan, Helen Lohre, Henry Meyerrose, John Murray.

4TH SUNDAY
CC: Steve Statkus (cell: 513-720-8955) ACC: TBD Tow Pilots: Ron Blume, Matt Davis, Tim Morris. Instructors: John Lubon, Kat McManus. Crew: Lynn Alexander, Bill Barone, Mauricio Berrizbeitia, Richard Cedar, Shelby Estell, Jeff Grawe, M. Hosta, Keith Kilpatrick, Dan Reagan, Pete Schradin, Stefano Sinigaglia, Laviniu Tirca John Williams. 2018

5th WEEKEND CREW DAYS:
Mar 31– 4th Sat Crew
Apr 29 – 4th Sun Crew
Jun 30 – 1st Sat Crew
Jul 29 – 1st Sun Crew
Sep 29 – 2nd Sat Crew
Sep 30 – 2nd Sun Crew
Dec 29 – 3rd Sat
Dec 30 – 3rd Sun POINTS OF CONTACT:

PRESIDENT: John Lubon
SAFETY OFFICER: Kevin Price
DIR OF OPS: Mark Miller
DIR OF FACILITIES: Keith Kilpatrick
BUSINESS MANAGER: Jon Stewart, BusinessManager@nullsoarccsc.com
FREQUENT FLYER EDITOR: Jim Dudley, FrequentFlyer@nullsoarccsc.com Note: See Membership Roster on soarccsc.com for phone numbers and email addresses for all members. Revised 01/04/2018 mkm

Jan 30, 2018 Frequent Flyer

Posted Leave a commentPosted in featured

NEWS YOU NEED TO KNOW

  • Annual Banquet this Saturday, February 17 – Still time to sign up Annual Banquet this Saturday, February 17 – Still time to sign up
  • Sign up for Grob-102 special plan Sign up for Grob-102 special plan

CALENDAR OF UPCOMING EVENTS

  • Feb 3 Board of Directors meeting- 9:30 AM – John Lubon
  • Feb 17 SSD dba CCSC Annual Awards Celebration & Banquet – John Lubon
  • Apr 11 Annual Meeting of SSD dba CCSC & Election – John Lubon
  • Apr 14 Spring Cleanup at CCSC – Keith Kilpatrick
  • Apr 21 Cincinnati Chapter of Ferrari Club of America Event – Maury Drummey
  • Apr 21 Pot Luck Dinner Apr 21 Pot Luck Dinner
  • Apr 28 Sailplane Weight & Balance Party – Chuck Lohre
  • May 20-31 1-26 Championship Contest – Steve Statkus
  • Jun 16 Cincinnati Chapter of Ferrari Club of America Event – Maury Drummey
  • Jun 16 Pot Luck Dinner Jun 16 Pot Luck Dinner

 4th SATURDAY REPORT – CHUCK LOHRE

Amazingly the field was dry enough to fly, but the rain started coming down. We were in the shop surveying the Grob-103 with Plane Captain, Chris Uhl, and all that was needed to get her back into service was checking the tire pressures and taping the elevator and ailerons. Luckily Andrew Dignan thought to stop at Home Depot on the way to breakfast at the Village Restaurant and pick up a half gallon of acetone, lacquer thinner and mineral spirts along with some shop towels. We made quick work of that and then John Lubon January 30, 2018 showed us how to avoid worrying about the rain by just moving the ship pieces from the shop to the hanger through the door. Larry Kirkbride helped by remembering that you need to lift on the leading and trailing edge of the root of the wing when you are installing the second wing (left).

With Charlie Lohre holding said wing up with his back as taught by John Murray, we put her together in no time.

Chuck Lohre ran around sharing his “Red Grease” liberally to whoever wanted some.

Ethan Saladin and Guy Byers were helpful with attaching the horizontal stabilizer.

Here’s a great shot of John Murray’s new “Tip Art” for the 2018 season. He was inspired by the Schleicher Christmas Card which used his boomerang motif. Good luck for this years season, John, you’ll have the best looking ship wherever you land.

John also was showing us how to do the weight and balance on a glider. The fuselage has to be at an exact level point indicated by having the tail boom precisely level according to the glider’s manual. John has done this so often that on the wall of his shop are the full-scale drawings needed to measure the angles. We plan to have a “Weight and Balance Party” on our April 28 crew day, so get your manual out and be prepared to know the angle of the dangle for your glider if you want to get weighed. Contact Chuck Lohre to sign up, 513-260-9205, chuck@nulllohre.com. There will be guidance in the next newsletter to help you gather the information that you need to prepare to get accurate weight and balance data for your glider.

1-26 CHAMPIONSHIP CONTEST LOGO

Chuck Lohre shared the 1-26 Championship’s logo at breakfast on Saturday. Larry Kirkbride noted that the nose of the A and B models were a bit too long since Chuck used the E model in the clubhouse as his reference. How does this look, Larry?

 

SEEKING TEAM MEMBERS FOR 1-26 CONTEST – STEVE STATKUS

Ladies and gents, I’m entering my 1-26 in the 2018 1-26 championship, but as a team glider. Not a traditional 2 person team but as a multiple pilot team. I’m looking for a minimum of 5 pilots to join TEAM CCSC. We already have a Team Manager and Spiritual Guru; OutLand Bob Root has agreed to provide coaching, leadership, and spiritual guidance to the team. He’s also charged with keeping the beer cooler filled. I’ll cover the entry fee you’ll just pay tow fees to 2 K AGL at the normal club rate. We’ve planned for ten contest days and two practice days so I’d expect each pilot to be ready to fly for two days and retrieve crew for two days. Really we won’t fly 10 days due to weather and pilot fatigue but we’ll accommodate your schedule.

I’ll have my glider ready in March and I’d like each pilot to take a couple of flights to get familiar with the bird and the instrumentation. I’d like each pilot to demonstrate a short field landing also. You don’t have to have 1-26 time in your log book. This Team CCSC is about having FUN and if we come in last lets just get some distance points for bragging rights. ZERO PRESSURE, FUN METER PEGGED AT MAX. – Steve Statkus call sign Buckeye

 

WHICH BADGE DO YOU PLAN TO EARN IN 2018?

The requirements for the “A”, “B” and “C” badges have been discussed in the past two issues of this newsletter. By the time you earn your C Badge you should be ready or already have completed your Practical Test for your Private Pilot Certificate. If you have already passed your Practical Test and have not been awarded these badges, find one of the following SSA-instructors and show him your log book: Charlie DeBerry, Dick Eckels, Dennis Fisher, Jim Goebel, Joe Jackson, Larry Kirkbride, Brian Lewis, Paul McClaskey, Bob Miller.

Bronze Badge 

The next in the series is the Bronze Badge, which helps pilots to begin preparing for the challenges of cross-country soaring. Here are the requirements for the Bronze Badge.

 Complete the A, B and C Badges

 Complete 15 solo hours in Gliders.

o 30 solo flights, including

o 10 flights in a single-place glider (if possible).

 Complete 2 flights, each lasting 2 hours or more.

 Perform

o 3 solo spot landings witnessed by an SSAI. (Within 400 feet for a 2-33)

o 2 dual accuracy landings without altimeter.

 Pass a Closed Book Written Test Covering Cross-country Techniques and Knowledge.

You will already have the skills needed by the time you complete the Practical Test, you will just need a few more solo flights terminating in Spot Landings witnessed by one of the instructors listed above. But some may react, “Oh, no! Not another written test.” The good thing is that you can take the test at CCSC, you just need to get one of the instructors to administer it. How about setting a goal to complete the test before the weather turns good and everyone would rather be out flying than inside taking a test.

To help you prepare for this test The Soaring Safety Foundation provides a Study Guide listing questions and a reference to the help you delve more deeply into each topic. For instance, here is one of the questions:

Q1) A flat bottomed cumulus cloud with sharp edges

a) is a reliable indication of thermal lift
b) indicates a dissipating thermal
c) is not a reliable indication of thermal lift

Additional Bronze Badge Questions will be included in future editions of this newsletter, but don’t wait. The Study Guide serves as a practice test and in your library you already have the reference materials to review the topics that are not already familiar.

GROB-102 PLAN FOR 2018 – UNLIMITED FLIGHTS FOR SINGLE A/C USE FEE

The board approved treating the Grob-102 in the same manner as for the past three years, so if you want to take best advantage of BG in 2018 you want to declare that desire and sign up. Everyone who wants to fly BG is asked sign up and prepay $90. For the rest of the year those members may fly up to 2-hour blocks as many times as they want with no additional Aircraft Use Fee. Other members will be charged $25 for each Aircraft Use and will be limited to 1-hour blocks. The Hook-up Fee, Basic Tow Fee and Altitude Index Fee will follow the Schedule of Fees and Dues for all pilots, only the Aircraft Use Fee and the flight duration limit are different.

This will be a big help if your goal is the C badge (solo flight exceeding 60 minutes) or Bronze badge (at least 10 flights in a single-place glider with at least two flights having a duration of two hours or more) or the silver badge. If you want to fly the G-102 more than four times or for flights lasting more than an hour with no additional Aircraft Use Fee in 2018 it is to your advantage to declare that desire by email to Jim Dudley. The $90 G-102 Fee will appear on your March statement, payable by March 31.

ANNUAL AWARDS CELEBRATION AND BANQUET – JOHN LUBON

Our club has a tradition of celebrating the soaring achievements of members at a great banquet. All members are encouraged to join in this event. Bring your spouse, family, friends and anyone you know who would be interested in knowing more about soaring at Caesar Creek Soaring Club and enjoying a delicious meal. Here are the details for this year’s banquet:

WHEN: This Saturday, February 17, 2018 4:00 pm- Social Hour (Cash bar) 5:00 pm- Awards and Achievements for 2017 6:00 pm- Dinner

MENU: Choice of steak or salmon. Two types of salad, green beans almandine, baked potato, rice pilaf, seasonal vegetable, fresh breads, delicious homemade dessert buffet, coffee and tea. Two glasses of wine or beer included in meal cost. No need to select your entree in advance. Correction: The legendary Valley Vineyards Private Cookout is available only during the summer, so we will enjoy a sit-down-and-be-served event instead.

COST: $37.50 per person

WHERE: Valley Vinyards 2276 East US 22 & 3, Morrow, Ohio

RSVP: FrequentFlyer@nullsoarccsc.com

ANNUAL FIELD FLIGHT REVIEW REQUIRED NOW

Remember that CCSC has a requirement that each member complete a CCSC Field Flight Review with a CCSC instructor and get the instructor’s endorsement in his/her logbook each calendar year prior to acting as PIC of any CCSC glider (UOP 4.2-Pilot Qualifications). Your first CCSC glider flight of the year must be with an instructor. Take advantage of the good winter days ahead to get the requirement completed well in advance of the great spring soaring that is sure to follow. You will want to spend your time soaring then, not waiting for your turn to do the Flight Review. Also, check your logbook. Do you need to complete the FAR 61.56 Flight Review this year? If so, why not combine the two flight reviews and get both completed when they will not interfere with the soaring you want to do during the great weather later this year.

4th SUNDAY REPORT – STEVE STATKUS

The most important piece of news is that the cats are all out of food and they’re not happy about the situation. I think the soft life has added to their girth such that mice are not concerned wrt the cats.

No flight operations Sunday due to the wet/soft field. Tow pilot Tim Morris and instructor John Lubon spent 30 minutes examining the field from 4 ft AGL, (approximate height of a golf cart seat) and determined that we had no more then about 500 feet of usable runway on either end. Standing water was abundant and as the day warmed up the permafrost melted making the situation worse.

Black ice took us by surprise a couple of times on the way in Sunday. In fact one car, two cars ahead of me took a detour into the trees on a descending curve heading down to the river. I got a new respect for anti-lock Toyota brakes as I slide past two 90 degree turns on my way in.

So the hangar doors were closed and those few Mighty 4th members who showed up spent some quality time inspecting the barn roof, from the inside. Pete Schraden, our own union carpenter, held forth about the methods of roof repair/replacement.

We bailed at noon and headed home to attack the list of honey-dos.- Steve Statkus

AGENDA FOR BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING SATURDAY, FEB 3, 9:30AM

A tentative agenda for the upcoming meeting of the board of directors is provided below. Meetings are open to members who are interested.

Call to Order at 09:30 AM, 2/3/2018 – John Lubon 

Reports & Statements of Officers 

o Approval of Minutes from 1/6/18 – Jim Dudley

o Treasurer’s Report – Rolf Hegele

o Membership – Dick Scheper

o Flight Operations – Mark Miller

o Tow Pilots & Tow Plane Maintenance – Tim Christman

o Glider Maintenance – Steve Statkus

o Airport Facilities Maintenance – Keith Kilpatrick

o Capital Projects – Henry Meyerrose

o Airport Operations – ?

o Special Events (Banquet) – John Lubon

Old Business 

o Revision of Uniform Operating Procedures (At the January 6, 2018 meeting the effort to find a compromise solution to the firearms issue was deferred to the February 3 meeting. Any change in the firearms policy will require an additional revision to the UOP)

o 1-26 National championship May 23-30, 2018 – Steve Statkus (Update)

o 2019 Sports Class National Competition – Chuck Lohre (Update)

o Website Upgrade– (Chuck Lohre has evaluated our website and has recommendations for improvement)

o Preparations for Annual Meeting (The Code of Regulations in Article V-Section 1 requires a meeting of the shareholders of the Club on the second Wednesday in April of each year (April 11, 2018) for the election of officers and any other business requiring shareholder approval. Have sufficient candidates come forward to fill the four open director positions? What other business requires shareholder approval this year?)

o Reconsideration of Termination of Robert Bohl (At the January Board meeting Robert Bohl (Account #4448) was terminated because he had not responded to several attempts to contact him about paying his balance due. No payments had been received since May 2017. Subsequent to the meeting payment was received for about half of the balance due. Will Robert Bohl be reinstated if/when payment in full is received?)

o Barn Roof (Leaks in the roof of the barn continue to threaten the structural members of the barn. Henry has obtained a quote to replace the main roof for $13K (material & labor) and the three small extension roofs for an additional $8K (material & labor). Materials for the three small extension roofs is estimated to cost about $3K, so the club could save about $5K if we do the work ourselves on the three small extension roofs. Will enough club members volunteer to join in a roofing project to make this a viable solution?

New business 

o Action Plan for Delinquent Accounts (A few member accounts remain unpaid and the members are unresponsive to Rolf’s efforts to collect. Shall CCSC employ a collection agency for delinquent and unresponsive accounts or take other approaches to collect overdue flight fees & dues?)

o Schedule CCSC events for 2018 – (It is time to set some dates for CCSC events during 2018: Youth Education Week, Adult Camp, etc.)

o Request to operate Stemme S12 during Ferrari Club of America event at CCSC (At the January meeting of the board it was approved to invite the Cincinnati chapter of the Ferrari Club of America to hold an outing at our gliderport on April 21 or June 16, with the expectation that 15-20 of the members of the Cincinnati Ferrari Club who come to CCSC will take full price Introductory Flights. Initial publicity about the event has resulted in an inquiry from the Toledo Representative of the Ferrari Club of America, Rick Lederman, requesting permission to fly his Stemme S12 motor glider to our gliderport and land here. Will the board grant permission to Mr. Lederman to operate his Stemme S12 at our gliderport during the Ferrari Club event?)

o Is there more? If so, send topic information to Jim DudleySoars@nullgmail.com .

FIREARMS COMPROMISE REVISION TO UNIFORM OPERATING PROCEDURES

At the December meeting the Board approved a revision to the UOP. On 12/5/2017 that proposed revision was communicated to all CCSC members by (1) email to each active member with both the text of the proposed revision in final form and in a form that displayed in color all changes from the June 6, 2015 version; (2)announcement in the Frequent Flyer with links to the text on the website; and (3) announcement on the website Members Only page with links to the same two documents emailed to each member. Each of those announcements described the process for implementation, including the 30-day period for members to submit written objections.

At the January board meeting it was reported that 15 written objections had been received which requested no change to the firearms policy expressed in section 8.11. No objections were reported relative to any of the other changes to the UOP. Although strict compliance with the procedures for revising the UOP did not require withdrawal of the firearms policy change for just 15 objections, at the January meeting the board implemented the proposed changes to the UOP as approved at the December 2017 meeting and published for review for all changes except changes to section 8.11 pertaining to firearms. There was no revision to section 8.11 in the UOP currently in force.

At the board meeting there was a brief discussion about compromise solutions. Steve Statkus read a prepared statement describing how he felt a “Turkey Shoot” could be conducted to assure safety. Part of that proposal was that such special events would require preapproval by the board.

It was decided to defer discussion about the compromise solution until the February 3, 2018, meeting and to assure that all members are informed about the topic on the agenda.

Appeal: If you have an opinion about this matter, especially if you can propose a compromise solution which will be good for CCSC and satisfy most of the members, please provide your opinions, ideas and recommendations to a board member prior to the meeting.

LEADERS NEEDED: TWO DIRECTORS, ONE CREW CHIEF, etc.

The eleven directors of SSD dba CCSC are elected for three-year terms which are staggered so we need to elect three or four each year at the Annual Meeting on the second Wednesday of April (4/11/2018). This year the terms in office for John Lubon, Tim Christman and Brian Stoops expire, so we need to elect three directors for three-year terms to fill those posiitons. In addition, Steve Statkus has resigned from his position as director so we need to elect one director to finish out the two remaining years of Steve’s term. John Lubon and Tim Christman have each agreed to serve an additional 3-year term if reelected, but that still leaves two positions which must be filled by other members. If you would consider contributing your leaership skills to serving the club in this way, please contact John Lubon or any other member of the board and John will add your name to the list of candidates.

Brian Stoops has a new job which requires him to work weekends so Brian will not run for reelection as a director. Also, he has resigned from his Crew Chief duties so there is an urgent need for a new Chief for the Third Sunday Crew. Contact Mark Miller if you are willing to help in this way.

There are additional appointed leadership positions which are currently vacant where your skills and interests may match the club needs. Speak with any of the current directors and indicate your

HELP FINDING SOMEONE TO SWAP CREW DAY ASSIGNMENTS

A web-based process for facilitating swapping crew day assignments was announced in the 2/21/2017 Frequent Flyer along with instructions for using the system. This process is intended to help members find another member who will agree to swap crew duties for one specific set of dates. It is not for getting reassigned to a different crew for an indefinite period. Mark Miller is now the person who oversees crew assignments, so Mark is the one to whom you need to speak about a long term change.

Remember that UOP 2.2 CREW MEMBER DUTIES states: “All crew members are to report for duty at 9:30 AM and work until released by the Crew Chief. Each crew member is personally responsible for arranging for a qualified substitute in case of his or her absence. Scheduled crew members are expected to be present for each of their scheduled crew days regardless of flying conditions.” This new process does not relieve any crew member from the responsibility for arranging for a qualified substitute and informing the crew chief; rather it is intended to help accomplish that task.

As of 6:00 pm on 2/13/2018 there is one request for a member to swap or substitute a crew day.
Date: 1st Saturday in July 07-07-2018
Skills: Crew
Click Here: Sub/Swap

WANTED TO BUY

Open trailer Schweizer, Gehrlein or equivalent. Any condition. Contact: Guy Byars

FOR SALE

Craftsman Snow Blower 22″, Self-propelled, 2-stage, Electric start. $195. Contact Tim Christman (937)475-1445

Schweizer SGS 1-23, S/N 14, MFG Date May1950, includes open trailer. Has won vintage sailplane awards. Contact Thomas G. Bonser.

Note: See Membership Roster on website for contact information for all members.

CCSC MEDIA

Note: See Membership Roster on website for contact information for all members.
CCSC IS ON FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/CaesarCreekSoaringClub
CCSC WEBSITE www.soarccsc.com
MINUTES FROM BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETINGS http://www.soarccsc.com/resources/members/meetingminutes/ (The password is printed on your monthly statement.)

CCSC GROUND CREWS:

1ST SATURDAY
CC: Steve Fenstermaker (cell: 937-581-7713) Tow Pilots: John Armor, CR Gillespie. Instructors: Paul McClaskey, Tom McDonald. Crew: Gerry Daugherty, Mark Hanlon, Joe Jaap, Kevin Price, Dan Beans, Jul Alvarez, D. Mattmuller, B. Sanbongi, A. Quinn, Michael Zengel, Waseem Jamali.

1ST SUNDAY – Training Crew
CC: Mike Karraker (cell: 937-830-0627) ACC: Mark Miller. Tow Pilots: Manfred Maurer, Norb Maurer, Dieter Schmidt, Andy Swanson. Instructors: Bob Miller. Crew: Don Burns, Bill Clawson, Christian Maurer, Ethan Maxwell, Eran Moscona, Dave Rawson, Joe Zeis..

2ND SATURDAY
CC: Dick Holzwarth (cell: 937-542-9612) ACC: Jim Marks, Bob Root. Tow Pilots: Haskell Simpkins. Instructors: Bob Anderson, Bill Gabbard, Jim Price. Crew: Bill Hall, Ron Kellerman, Brian Mork, Chloe Williams, Michael Williams.

2ND SUNDAY
CC: Dave Menchen (cell: 513-313-2315) ACC: Lucy Anne McKosky. Tow Pilots: Lorrie Penner, Gordon Penner, Instructors: Jim Goebel, Tom McDonald, Tom Rudolf. Crew: Dave Conrad, Fred Hawk, Dan Katuzienski, Mike McKosky.

3RD SATURDAY
CC: Maury Drummey (cell: 513-871-1998) ACC: Rolf Hegele. Tow Pilots: Don Green, Steve McManus, Dick Scheper.

3RD SUNDAY
CC: Mark Miller (acting) (cell: 513-235-6128) ACC: TBD Tow Pilots: Tony Bonser, Tim Christman. Instructors: Dick Eckels, Crew: Darin Caviness, Otis Lewis, Dan Miner, Tony Rein, Zach Siefker, David Whapham,

4TH SATURDAY
CC: Chuck Lohre (cell: 513-260-9025) ACC: Ethan Saladin. Tow Pilots: Guy Byars, Larry Kirkbride. Instructors: John Atkins, Joe Jackson. Crew: Edgar Byars, Ross Bales, Andrew Dignan, Helen Lohre, Henry Meyerrose, John Murray.

4TH SUNDAY
CC: Steve Statkus (cell: 513-720-8955) ACC: TBD Tow Pilots: Ron Blume, Matt Davis, Tim Morris. Instructors: John Lubon, Kat McManus. Crew: Lynn Alexander, Bill Barone, Mauricio Berrizbeitia, Richard Cedar, Shelby Estell, Jeff Grawe, M. Hosta, Keith Kilpatrick, Dan Reagan, Pete Schradin, Stefano Sinigaglia, Laviniu Tirca John Williams. 2018

5th WEEKEND CREW DAYS:
Mar 31– 4th Sat Crew
Apr 29 – 4th Sun Crew
Jun 30 – 1st Sat Crew
Jul 29 – 1st Sun Crew
Sep 29 – 2nd Sat Crew
Sep 30 – 2nd Sun Crew
Dec 29 – 3rd Sat
Dec 30 – 3rd Sun POINTS OF CONTACT:

PRESIDENT: John Lubon
SAFETY OFFICER: Kevin Price
DIR OF OPS: Mark Miller
DIR OF FACILITIES: Keith Kilpatrick
BUSINESS MANAGER: Jon Stewart, BusinessManager@nullsoarccsc.com
FREQUENT FLYER EDITOR: Jim Dudley, FrequentFlyer@nullsoarccsc.com Note: See Membership Roster on soarccsc.com for phone numbers and email addresses for all members. Revised 01/04/2018 mkm